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TheNarrator

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Posts: 3,278
Reply with quote  #3811 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog
[image] 


I didn't realize you wanted Trump in jail
DietCoke

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Reply with quote  #3812 
Good opinion piece.  Wake up Reps! Is this what you really want for America???

So This Is What American Greatness Really Looks Like?

Another week of new low after new low. If this is what making America great looks like, God help us when it arrives.

This week, Garry Kasparov, former Russian chess champion and perennial critic of Vladimir Putin, tweeted about what autocrats do when caught: “1: Deny, lie, slander accusers. 2: Say it was a misunderstanding. 3. Boast & say ‘What are you going to do about it?’”

The day after that tweet, Donald Trump stood on a dais in Paris beside the French president and said of his son’s now-confirmed willingness to receive campaign help for his father from Russia: “I think it’s a meeting that most people in politics probably would have taken.”

That would be jaw dropping and bizarre coming from a mob boss at his pretrial hearing, let alone from the president of the United States. But that line is now standard issue among much of Trump’s political party, which has come around to the notion that collusion with a foreign power—even an adversarial one like Russia—is no big deal.

Trump, his family, and his defenders in the once Grand Old Party have mounted various defenses for his campaign’s collusion with Russians and their cutouts to win the 2016 presidential election. They have tried to ignore Russiagate. They have said collusion with Russia never happened. They have blamed Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and Loretta Lynch (Trump now says the Russian government lawyer who met with Donald Jr. was only in the country because Lynch let her in. It will surprise no one to discover that’s not true.) And they have landed on the notion that even if collusion did happen, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with it. Check off all three of the Kasparov boxes.

With Trump’s ascension, the Russification of the Republican Party, which once supported apartheid-era South Africa and continues to back a Cuba embargo, both on the basis of keeping countries out of Russia’s sphere of influence, is complete. Trump, who in the 1980s complained that Ronald Reagan was too tough on the Soviets, and who has used Russians, including reputed mobsters, as everything from bailouts to buyers to brokers for the expansion of his hotel and pageant franchises, has officially brought kakistocracy to Washington. None but the most unmoored to any recognizable morality need apply. He has made fools of his own spokespeople. He has exposed the religious right’s leaders as very much men of this world, with all its hatred and avarice. He has unleashed the forces of white nationalism and even neo-Nazism in our country. And he has revealed an America that is far less than we thought we were eight years ago when the United States became the first former slave republic to make a member of its once entrapped minority population its national leader.

One wonders whether this democracy, as fragile as it has been revealed to be, and whether the presidency as an institution is entirely salvageable, now that Trump has exploded the norms we thought constrained the office at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Since becoming president, Trump has flouted the emoluments clause and openly profited from his office, taking payments from all comers, from the State Department to foreign governments at his golf courses, hotels and his private Florida club. He has encouraged his children to treat the White House as a marketing tool for the Trump businesses, and allowed them to commingle their business activities and ongoing involvement in his government. He has turned American foreign policy into a Santa’s workshop for Saudi and Russian interests and goals, from the needless fight with Qatar to pulling the U.S. out of the Paris climate accords to attempting to return the Kremlin’s spy facilities, which the Obama administration seized in retaliation for Russian interference in our election, to giving Russian oligarchs direct financial interest in the Keystone pipeline boondoggle to having his administration lean on House members to soften a Russia sanctions package. (He even briefly floated the outrageous and absurd notion of cybersecurity cooperation with the Kremlin.) He has invited the Russian foreign ministry into the Oval Office out of the eye and earshot of the American media, who now are reduced to audio-only press briefings where they take a back seat to Trump sycophant right-wing blogs, and he has now canoodled with Putin himself, taking the murderous Russian autocrat’s word for it that no election meddling occurred.

Trump has made political thuggery the new American political standard; throwing allies overboard and cuddling up to dictators and autocrats around the world. He has diminished American influence and credibility every day he has been in office.

Meanwhile, he has stripped the presidency of its basic dignity, tweeting his every thought at all hours of the day. He presents America in his world travels as a troglodyte nation, led by an ill-mannered, ill-tempered, praise-needy buffoon—a real life Joffrey Baratheon—who still thinks he’s a television performer, and whose attention to duty lasts only as long as his favorite Fox shows aren’t on.

Domestically, he has thrown the country into chaos, from his Muslim travel bans to his utter incoherence on health care, which he and his party are threatening to strip from up to 23 million people so they can fork over a trillion dollars to America’s own oligarchs. Putin must be positively gleeful at the damage his little ruse—tricking the arrogant ignoramuses of the Trump campaign into believing Russian hackers had the goods on Hillary, and then reeling them in—has wrought.

And so, a political party that long prided itself on a particular kind of patriotism now welcomes foreign interference, so long as it helps them win. A nation that dragged itself, painfully, from slavery to the Voting Rights Act now faces a federal government that is the single biggest threat to the right of all people to vote. A country that stuck out its chest in promoting a particular kind of greatness now wallows in defunding public education, gutting scientific research, and promoting basic ignorance about the planet in the service of bygone industries belching pollution into the air and water, as if American innovation that could create new industries and new jobs for those displaced workers is no longer possible.

Meanwhile, our children are learning that bullies do indeed prosper; that cruelty and narcissism can be a pathway to power, that one of our two major parties believes the poor and struggling do not deserve health care, and that according to the president of the United States, women essentially have no value beyond their looks and dress sizes.

One wonders whether the presidency can recover, or whether we’re doomed to live in an endless cycle of lowbrow celebrity autocracy—America remade in the image of Italy’s Silvio Berlusconi.

Already, other entertainers are bellying up to the bar, eager to follow Trump’s grubby example and take their turn at political powerball. We could soon have a national leadership that includes The Rock, Kid Rock, and who knows, maybe Ted Nugent, now that white nationalism and public vulgarity have gone mainstream.

What hope is there for a country that has reduced itself to this? What future? For now, it’s hard to see a particularly bright one. If this is what making America great looks like, God help us when greatness ensues.

__________________
“If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower
keepinitreal

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Posts: 22,681
Reply with quote  #3813 
Like dewy, BS and Joisey would so eloquently say like chicken Little during the obama reign,

"The sky is falling, the sky is falling"

The maximum height of hyperbole written in that article

EX:

Meanwhile, our children are learning that bullies do indeed prosper; that cruelty and narcissism can be a pathway to power

One wonders whether the presidency can recover

Domestically, he has thrown the country into chaos

 We could soon have a national leadership that includes The Rock, Kid Rock, and who knows, maybe Ted Nugent, now that white nationalism and public vulgarity have gone mainstream.






Gimme a fukn break, GD race baiters



__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
DietCoke

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Posts: 2,150
Reply with quote  #3814 
This kind of blind loyalty is what lets dictators rise to power.  Unbelievable.

From the weekly Standard (but widely reported) -

This Woman Shows Just How Loyal Trump's Supporters Really Are

A county party official in Tennessee suggests the president would have to maybe "kill someone" to lose her support.
 

Several reporters were piqued Thursday evening by a county-level Republican official's one-liner cited in the Tennessean:

[Pearson is] more ashamed of the way Democrats, the media and opponents have attacked her president, and she is disappointed in congressional Republicans for not doing more to help Trump.

She applauded Donald Trump Jr. for releasing his emails about a meeting with a Russian attorney in the midst of the campaign against Clinton.

There’s very little that would change her mind about Trump.

“I don’t know what he would have to do … I guess maybe kill someone. Just in cold blood,” Pearson said.

Lest we forget that Trump himself said during the campaign he "could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody" and not lose voters; the ugliness of the imagery notwithstanding, it all goes to underscore the inflexibility of the president's support from then to now.

But there's another line in the story's passage that received almost zero play among the same set of media. If we're casting aside the meaning of sample size and using this one individual as perhaps an epitome of Trump's support, it's worth noting that the person "applauded" Donald Trump Jr. for dumping his email exchange with Rob Goldstone just before the New York Times hit "publish" on its report about the message chain. Recall that his decision at least befuddled, if not not inspired mockery from observers close to the center of the action in Washington, D.C. Was it an act of incompetence? Desperation?

Whatever it was, it allowed the Trump-sympathetic press and many sympathizers to control their some positive version of the story. For Bill O'Reilly, it was to highlight that the Russian lawyer with whom Trump Jr. met was a fraud. For many more, it was that Trump Jr. was transparent: a comment made by the most important person who could've done it.

"My son is a high-quality person and I applaud his transparency," said President Trump in a statement on Tuesday. He repeated the "transparent" remark early Wednesday morning, 11 hours before the Tennessean article posted.

The voter quoted in the piece "applauded" Trump Jr., too.


__________________
“If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower
PDad

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Reply with quote  #3815 
I didn't bother to read it since it was written by MSNBC's AM Joy. I wrote her off after happening to see her response to Harold Ford, Jr saying Hispanics will provide future growth of Dem party - she got indignant and said black voters are the base of the Dem party and they can't allow anyone to undermine them. The shocked look on Harold's face was priceless. lol

Add: I'm referring to first article.
PDad

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Reply with quote  #3816 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DietCoke
This kind of blind loyalty is what lets dictators rise to power.  Unbelievable.

Fear monger much? It exists on both sides. Both major parties receive a ton of blind partisan support and both nominated the most unpopular candidates ever. 
spazsdad

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Reply with quote  #3817 
Joy-Ann Reid. Lolz
The same hack that buys her way to the top of Twitter trends every Saturday morning

__________________
#SCOTUS
keepinitreal

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Posts: 22,681
Reply with quote  #3818 
Diet coke slides further left every week
__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Posts: 22,681
Reply with quote  #3819 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog
How 'bout it, Terp?...........You either side with Trump, or side to throw America away!


[e542e49c7ef4f0dfb4232321e67f81d3] 





__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
DietCoke

Registered:
Posts: 2,150
Reply with quote  #3820 
Can you even begin to imagine DT ever doing anything like Jimmy Carter has done over the past decades?

Not in a million years.

Not his kids, either.


From Independent -

While Trump enjoys golf, former president Jimmy Carter, 92, is building homes for the poor

Mr Carter returned to work on a building site after being taken to hospital for dehydration, while President Trump kicked back at the US Women's Open



It’s a tale of two very different commander-in-chiefs.

Former US president Jimmy Carter, 92, spent this week building homes for the needy in Winnipeg, Canada.

Despite being rushed to hospital on Thursday after collapsing from dehydration under the hot sun, he returned to the construction site the following day after a clean bill of health.  

This week was the 34th time that Jimmy and his 89-year-old wife Rosalynn have volunteered on a project with Habitat for Humanity, an affordable housing charity for vulnerable people.

While Mr Carter spent the day in a hard hat, current US president Donald Trump was watching golf.

He spent eight hours at the US Women’s Open, hosted at his own Trump National Golf Club in New Jersey.

Friday was the 36th day he has spent at one of his own golf clubs in the 176 days of his presidency to date, according to trumpgolfcount.com, which tracks the president’s outings.

This means he has spent 20 per cent of his time in office at one of his own golf courses. At the same point in his presidency, Barack Obama had spent eight days at a golf course.

Friday was the first time a sitting president has attended the US Women’s Open. Such visits require a huge and costly security detail.

The outing comes after a week of revelations about his son Donald Trump Jr’s previously undisclosed meeting during the 2016 election campaign with a Russian lawyer linked to the Kremlin.

President Trump arrived at his course at 3.40pm, distracting attention from the players and leaving only a “small handful of fans” actually watching the course, reported the Washington Post.

Less than four hours later in Winnipeg, Mr Carter addressed the building project's closing ceremony, at which he was given a standing ovation.

"I look upon all the volunteers, in a very sincere way, as human rights heroes, and I thank you for it," he said.

Mr Carter joked that his "bringing attention to this Habitat project was completely unintentional".

President from 1977 to 1981, Democrat Mr Carter lost a landslide election to Ronald Reagan and left office with low popularity ratings.

But his work advancing human rights in the four decades since has made him one of the most admired former presidents.

He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002 for his humanitarian work.


__________________
“If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower
DietCoke

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Posts: 2,150
Reply with quote  #3821 
So, Donnie, what changed???

(the image isn't posting well, so here's a link to the original -

https://twitter.com/SenatorCarper/status/870318297614606336 )


[DBP72xfXUAA2pbu]

__________________
“If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower
TheNarrator

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Posts: 3,278
Reply with quote  #3822 
D.C. - when quoting AM Joy, consider the exchange I just heard:

"This (Russians "hacking" our election) is worse than 9/11"
No interuption from Joy

"I wonder why President Obama, when the microphone was off, said we could be more flexible than we were in the past"
Joy loudly jumps in: "what about Obama is a losing argument - you have to let him go, release him into the universe."

Complete partisan hack. Joy, and her low info friends, constantly brought up Bush, including some that still do.
keepinitreal

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Posts: 22,681
Reply with quote  #3823 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheNarrator
D.C. - when quoting AM Joy, consider the exchange I just heard:

"This (Russians "hacking" our election) is worse than 9/11"
No interuption from Joy

"I wonder why President Obama, when the microphone was off, said we could be more flexible than we were in the past"
Joy loudly jumps in: "what about Obama is a losing argument - you have to let him go, release him into the universe."

Complete partisan hack. Joy, and her low info friends, constantly brought up Bush, including some that still do.


Perfect comparison, right on point. A hack will quote a hack

__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
PDad

Registered:
Posts: 3,943
Reply with quote  #3824 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DietCoke
So, Donnie, what changed???

(the image isn't posting well, so here's a link to the original -

https://twitter.com/SenatorCarper/status/870318297614606336 )

That doesn't show the dozens of signatories on the ad, presumably so people would mistake it as something Trump produced. Here's a link to reporting on it, including an image of the entire ad with the signatories - http://grist.org/politics/donald-trump-climate-action-new-york-times/

Trump’s signature on the ad, which ran in the Times on Dec. 6, 2009, stands out on a list dominated by liberal media and business figures, including the founder of Patagonia, the cofounders of Ben & Jerry’s, the president of CREDO Mobile, the executive producer of Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth, celebrity chef Tom Colicchio, actors Kate Hudson and Adrian Grenier, media heavyweights Martha Stewart and Graydon Carter, and New Age author Deepak Chopra.

None of the signers that Grist interviewed this week could recall who had organized the letter or knew who had asked Trump to sign. The website of the group listed on the ad, businessleaders4environmentalchange.us, is now defunct, and no information was available on who had registered it.

... Two months after signing the open letterhe told members of the Trump National Golf Club that Al Gore should be stripped of his Nobel Prize because that winter had been cold. “Gore wants us to clean up our factories and plants in order to protect us from global warming, when China and other countries couldn’t care less,” he said. “It would make us totally noncompetitive in the manufacturing world, and China, Japan and India are laughing at America’s stupidity.”

DietCoke

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Posts: 2,150
Reply with quote  #3825 
Way to go, Joe.  The (smart) Reps are slowly starting to turn.....

Trump is killing the Republican Party

 
By Joe Scarborough July 16 at 6:02 PM

 

I did not leave the Republican Party. The Republican Party left its senses. The political movement that once stood athwart history resisting bloated government and military adventurism has been reduced to an amalgam of talk-radio resentments. President Trump’s Republicans have devolved into a party without a cause, dominated by a leader hopelessly ill-informed about the basics of conservatism, U.S. history and the Constitution.

America’s first Republican president reportedly said , “Nearly all men can stand adversity. But if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” The current Republican president and the party he controls were granted monopoly power over Washington in November and already find themselves spectacularly failing Abraham Lincoln’s character exam.

It would take far more than a single column to detail Trump’s failures in the months following his bleak inaugural address. But the Republican leaders who have subjugated themselves to the White House’s corrupting influence fell short of Lincoln’s standard long before their favorite reality-TV star brought his gaudy circus act to Washington.

When I left Congress in 2001, I praised my party’s successful efforts to balance the budget for the first time in a generation and keep many of the promises that led to our takeover in 1994. I concluded my last speech on the House floor by foolishly predicting that Republicans would balance budgets and champion a restrained foreign policy for as long as they held power.

I would be proved wrong immediately.

As the new century began, Republicans gained control of the federal government. George W. Bush and the GOP Congress responded by turning a $155 billion surplus into a $1 trillion deficit and doubling the national debt, passing a $7 trillion unfunded entitlement program and promoting a foreign policy so utopian it would have made Woodrow Wilson blush. Voters made Nancy Pelosi speaker of the House in 2006 and Barack Obama president in 2008.

After their well-deserved drubbing, Republicans swore that if voters ever entrusted them with running Washington again, they would prove themselves worthy. Trump’s party was given a second chance this year, but it has spent almost every day since then making the majority of Americans regret it.

The GOP president questioned America’s constitutional system of checks and balances. Republican leaders said nothing. He echoed Stalin and Mao by calling the free press “the enemy of the people.” Republican leaders were silent. And as the commander in chief insulted allies while embracing autocratic thugs, Republicans who spent a decade supporting wars of choice remained quiet. Meanwhile, their budget-busting proposals demonstrate a fiscal recklessness very much in line with the Bush years.

Last week’s Russia revelations show just how shamelessly Republican lawmakers will stand by a longtime Democrat who switched parties after the promotion of a racist theory about Barack Obama gave him standing in Lincoln’s once-proud party. Neither Lincoln, William Buckley nor Ronald Reagan would recognize this movement.

It is a dying party that I can no longer defend.

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Jon Meacham has long predicted that the Republican and Democrats’ 150-year duopoly will end. The signs seem obvious enough. When my Republican Party took control of Congress in 1994, it was the first time the GOP had won the House in a generation. The two parties have been in a state of turmoil ever since.

In 2004, Republican strategist Karl Rove anticipated a majority that would last a generation; two years later, Pelosi became the most liberal House speaker in history. Obama was swept into power by a supposedly unassailable Democratic coalition. In 2010, the tea party tide rolled in. Obama’s reelction returned the momentum to the Democrats, but Republicans won a historic state-level landslide in 2014. Then last fall, Trump demolished both the Republican and Democratic establishments.

Political historians will one day view Donald Trump as a historical anomaly. But the wreckage visited of this man will break the Republican Party into pieces — and lead to the election of independent thinkers no longer tethered to the tired dogmas of the polarized past. When that day mercifully arrives, the two-party duopoly that has strangled American politics for almost two centuries will finally come to an end. And Washington just may begin to work again.


__________________
“If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower
DietCoke

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Posts: 2,150
Reply with quote  #3826 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDad

That doesn't show the dozens of signatories on the ad, presumably so people would mistake it as something Trump produced. Here's a link to reporting on it, including an image of the entire ad with the signatories - http://grist.org/politics/donald-trump-climate-action-new-york-times/


Uh, look again - it most certainly DOES show all the other signatories.  And you left out a couple of paragraphs from the Grist article -


In every conceivable way, the letter contradicts Trump’s current stance on climate policy. On the campaign trail, Trump has said he is “not a big believer in man-made climate change.” Last fall, after Obama described climate change as a major threat to the United States and the world, Trump said that was “one of the dumbest statements I’ve ever heard in politics — in the history of politics as I know it.”

The Trump campaign did not respond to a request for comment on Wednesday.   (Wonder why??)

Beyond the Times ad, Trump has supported climate causes and expressed concern about global warming at least twice before. In 2014, Trump sent a $5,000 check to Protect Our Winters, a climate advocacy nonprofit for skiers and snowboarders, after a Celebrity Apprenticecontestant requested his support.

The second time was when climate change hit The Trump Organization’s bottom line: His golf course in Ireland is threatened by coastal erosion, so the company recently applied for a permit to build a seawall to protect the property from “global warming and its effects.”

trump-letter


And why does it matter that no one can recall who asked Trump to sign?  No one forced him.  His name is on it.  Along with Jr., Eric and Ivanka.  Just goes to show what a hypocrite he is.  Like that comes as a big surprise, right?  Doesn't matter to you, though.


__________________
“If a political party does not have its foundation in the determination to advance a cause that is right and that is moral, then it is not a political party; it is merely a conspiracy to seize power.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower
keepinitreal

Registered:
Posts: 22,681
Reply with quote  #3827 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DietCoke
Way to go, Joe.  The (smart) Reps are slowly starting to turn.....

Trump is killing the Republican Party

 
By Joe Scarborough July 16 at 6:02 PM

 

I did not leave the Republican Party. The Republican Party left its senses. The political movement that once stood athwart history resisting bloated government and military adventurism has been reduced to an amalgam of talk-radio resentments. President Trump’s Republicans have devolved into a party without a cause, dominated by a leader hopelessly ill-informed about the basics of conservatism, U.S. history and the Constitution.

America’s first Republican president reportedly said , “Nearly all men can stand adversity. But if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” The current Republican president and the party he controls were granted monopoly power over Washington in November and already find themselves spectacularly failing Abraham Lincoln’s character exam.

It would take far more than a single column to detail Trump’s failures in the months following his bleak inaugural address. But the Republican leaders who have subjugated themselves to the White House’s corrupting influence fell short of Lincoln’s standard long before their favorite reality-TV star brought his gaudy circus act to Washington.

When I left Congress in 2001, I praised my party’s successful efforts to balance the budget for the first time in a generation and keep many of the promises that led to our takeover in 1994. I concluded my last speech on the House floor by foolishly predicting that Republicans would balance budgets and champion a restrained foreign policy for as long as they held power.

I would be proved wrong immediately.

As the new century began, Republicans gained control of the federal government. George W. Bush and the GOP Congress responded by turning a $155 billion surplus into a $1 trillion deficit and doubling the national debt, passing a $7 trillion unfunded entitlement program and promoting a foreign policy so utopian it would have made Woodrow Wilson blush. Voters made Nancy Pelosi speaker of the House in 2006 and Barack Obama president in 2008.

After their well-deserved drubbing, Republicans swore that if voters ever entrusted them with running Washington again, they would prove themselves worthy. Trump’s party was given a second chance this year, but it has spent almost every day since then making the majority of Americans regret it.

The GOP president questioned America’s constitutional system of checks and balances. Republican leaders said nothing. He echoed Stalin and Mao by calling the free press “the enemy of the people.” Republican leaders were silent. And as the commander in chief insulted allies while embracing autocratic thugs, Republicans who spent a decade supporting wars of choice remained quiet. Meanwhile, their budget-busting proposals demonstrate a fiscal recklessness very much in line with the Bush years.

Last week’s Russia revelations show just how shamelessly Republican lawmakers will stand by a longtime Democrat who switched parties after the promotion of a racist theory about Barack Obama gave him standing in Lincoln’s once-proud party. Neither Lincoln, William Buckley nor Ronald Reagan would recognize this movement.

It is a dying party that I can no longer defend.

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Jon Meacham has long predicted that the Republican and Democrats’ 150-year duopoly will end. The signs seem obvious enough. When my Republican Party took control of Congress in 1994, it was the first time the GOP had won the House in a generation. The two parties have been in a state of turmoil ever since.

In 2004, Republican strategist Karl Rove anticipated a majority that would last a generation; two years later, Pelosi became the most liberal House speaker in history. Obama was swept into power by a supposedly unassailable Democratic coalition. In 2010, the tea party tide rolled in. Obama’s reelction returned the momentum to the Democrats, but Republicans won a historic state-level landslide in 2014. Then last fall, Trump demolished both the Republican and Democratic establishments.

Political historians will one day view Donald Trump as a historical anomaly. But the wreckage visited of this man will break the Republican Party into pieces — and lead to the election of independent thinkers no longer tethered to the tired dogmas of the polarized past. When that day mercifully arrives, the two-party duopoly that has strangled American politics for almost two centuries will finally come to an end. And Washington just may begin to work again.



Bye Joe, if you're the Republican party, I'll just say......don't let the door hit ya, where the good Lord split ya

__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
TheNarrator

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Posts: 3,278
Reply with quote  #3828 
Team trump now taking aim at the secret service, saying if the meeting was so dangerous, why didn't they stop it.

Hopefully the SS is more professional than they man they protect
mikec

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Posts: 8,076
Reply with quote  #3829 
Guess it'll hit me too, because he is right on.

I've been saying for awhile now that the 2-party system is killing America.  If trump hastens the demise of that system, maybe he was good for something after all (other than a SCOTUS appointment, which looks good).



Quote:
Originally Posted by keepinitreal


Bye Joe, if you're the Republican party, I'll just say......don't let the door hit ya, where the good Lord split ya
mikec

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Posts: 8,076
Reply with quote  #3830 
DC - nobody is wanting to turn.  The anti-Establishment crowd elected an Establishment guy, who has greased his way right into the Establishment.

The Establishment is happy right now, which is why so many of them have forgotten their morals and will do anything to defend their guy.

And, lest you think Dems have some moral high horse, you're wrong.  As improbable as it seems, they are more morally bankrupt than the GOP.
keepinitreal

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Posts: 22,681
Reply with quote  #3831 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikec
Guess it'll hit me too, because he is right on.

I've been saying for awhile now that the 2-party system is killing America.  If trump hastens the demise of that system, maybe he was good for something after all (other than a SCOTUS appointment, which looks good).





Contradicting yourself

__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
uwApoligist

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Reply with quote  #3832 
Quote:
Originally Posted by keepinitreal


Contradicting yourself

hehe, you don't say.

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PDad

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Reply with quote  #3833 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DietCoke
Uh, look again - it most certainly DOES show all the other signatories.  (they don't appear on the tweet unless you click on the image to expand it) And you left out a couple of paragraphs from the Grist article -

In every conceivable way, the letter contradicts Trump’s current stance on climate policy. On the campaign trail, Trump has said he is “not a big believer in man-made climate change.” Last fall, after Obama described climate change as a major threat to the United States and the world, Trump said that was “one of the dumbest statements I’ve ever heard in politics — in the history of politics as I know it.”

(Hypocrite - seems you left out a couple of paragraphs here)

The Trump campaign did not respond to a request for comment on Wednesday.   (Wonder why??)

Beyond the Times ad, Trump has supported climate causes and expressed concern about global warming at least twice before. In 2014, Trump sent a $5,000 check to Protect Our Winters, a climate advocacy nonprofit for skiers and snowboarders, after a Celebrity Apprentice contestant requested his support.

The second time was when climate change hit The Trump Organization’s bottom line: His golf course in Ireland is threatened by coastal erosion, so the company recently applied for a permit to build a seawall to protect the property from “global warming and its effects.”

trump-letter


And why does it matter that no one can recall who asked Trump to sign?  No one forced him.  His name is on it.  Along with Jr., Eric and Ivanka.  Just goes to show what a hypocrite he is.  Like that comes as a big surprise, right?  Doesn't matter to you, though.


Speaking of hypocrites, you left out some paragraphs... I doubt they asked all 4 Trumps individually - more likely approached 1 or 2 Trumps. IOW, IF Daddy Trump okay'd it, very likely done without knowing what the letter said.

I left out the $5K donation because it was routine for Trump to make donations at the request of contestants, especially if they hadn't raised any on the show. IOW, it didn't represent his beliefs. http://www.grindtv.com/culture/donald-trump-climate-change-denier-donated-5000-to-protect-our-winters/

The donation came at the request of the reigning champion in Olympic women’s snowboard slopestyle, Jamie Anderson, who works with POW. After being “fired” on Trump’s reality show “Celebrity Apprentice,” Anderson asked Trump if he would make a donation to Protect Our Winters.

Regarding the sea wall, the article says it was for coastal erosion, which happens regardless of global warming. Reasons/justifications on requests should be taken with a grain of salt since they are aimed at getting it approved. Try it - it's a much better use of your abundant salt.

The truth is somewhere in between what anti-Trumpers and Trumpies say. Doesn't matter to you, though.
uwApoligist

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Reply with quote  #3834 
Everyone believes that reducing environmental impact of our activities is important.   The difference if you advocate that man must curtail his activities back to such a level we live like we did in paleo times, or you think doing what is economically feasible to maintain reasonable levels of modern living while continuing to reduce environmental impact where possible.

Turns out there is a good chance that we will be way ahead of Paris goals.  Solar panels prices have fallen 50% between 2016 and 2017.  http://archive.is/jbnjd  Solar and wind already account for 10% of energy production, and that is without achieving economic feasibility.   With prices on their current trend, we can expect to meet/exceed the Paris Accord numbers.

Wind generation is getting a new round of upgraded turbine blades that will greatly improve efficiency, and wind is already showing to be about 1/2 to 1/3 the cost of coal or natural gas. 


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PDad

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Reply with quote  #3835 
Quote:
Originally Posted by uwApoligist
Turns out there is a good chance that we will be way ahead of Paris goals.

The Paris "goals" were holding global warming below 2 and 1-1/2 degree centigrade increases - that ain't happening. 

The Morgan Stanley report and prediction cited by your Quartz article was focused on utilities, not the across-the-board commitment that was made. Utilities hitting the overall mark doesn't mean we'll hit it across the board. I expect there were different targets for utilities, vehicles and buildings that would aggregate to the overall target, so it's possible utilities were supposed to make a larger contribution.

The quoted 26-28% decrease by 2020 seems off both in accuracy and feasibility. The actual 26-28% commitment was by 2025 and there is a lower target for 2020. I've found another quote that says 2025. 
uwApoligist

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Reply with quote  #3836 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDad

The Paris "goals" were holding global warming below 2 and 1-1/2 degree centigrade increases - that ain't happening. 

The Morgan Stanley report and prediction cited by your Quartz article was focused on utilities, not the across-the-board commitment that was made. Utilities hitting the overall mark doesn't mean we'll hit it across the board. I expect there were different targets for utilities, vehicles and buildings that would aggregate to the overall target, so it's possible utilities were supposed to make a larger contribution.

The quoted 26-28% decrease by 2020 seems off both in accuracy and feasibility. The actual 26-28% commitment was by 2025 and there is a lower target for 2020. I've found another quote that says 2025. 

There is a base assumption in the Paris target on 2.5 C increases, that rise is all do to human created activity.   There are definitely natural processes in place.

Utilities will make the brunt of contributions for some time.  Cars/Vehicles remain stubbornly on petroleum products.  Stand alone electric is having a minor impact. 

Not sure why city buses, for instance here in Seattle, remain on diesel instead of moving to LNG.  Yeah I get the safety point, but the accident rate for professionally driven buses is very very low.  They moved the garbage trucks to lng a long time ago, and we have not seen the tragic predicted fireballs.   Fleet movement to LNG greatly reduces carbon footprint as LNG burns super clean.  

In fact I think the article was largely talking about movement from existing sources to wind and solar.  When they should also consider moving from existing sources to LNG and biomass. 

Either way.  We have a lot of innovation to continue in all of these areas.  I would love to see federal government recommit to those long term research projects in basic physics/chemistry/engineering that allow this innovation to accelerate.  Opposed to the DC and the communist socialist approach of using massive federal dollars to attempt to create false economic conditions.   When the replacements are economically feasible without continued massive cash injection from governments, you will see great uptake. 




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uwApoligist

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Reply with quote  #3837 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerpAlum
With regards to the Russian lawyer being in the US, I was basing that on Jr's emails. One states the lawyer needed to be in court so they moved the meeting. Could be another legal venue or a different client. I don't have the types of visas in front of me but I bet it was a work visa.

Seems like shenanigans on the part of Lynch/odummer.  She snuck the Russian lawyer in and then shopped her around with offers of salacious information on Clinton.  Several senators met with her, several representatives were contacted/met, on both the dem and the republican side.

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepavlich/2017/07/14/thats-odd-loretta-lynch-granted-russian-lawyer-us-entry-after-visa-was-denied-n2354594

In addition to trying entrap Trump and other republicans with Russian nothingburger bullsh1t.  They used the meeting to justify the FISA warrant for tapping Manifort and likely other campaign officials phones.  They had an open mic at the meeting the entire time.  They also used it to unmask Trump campaign officials. 

https://medium.com/@JackPosobiec/breaking-lynch-ordered-manaforts-phone-tapped-during-veselnitskaya-meeting-363824284be8


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You stick your middle finger in my face, and you interpret that the way you see fit. I'll interpret it the way I see fit. Then we can figure it out together.
mikec

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Reply with quote  #3838 
Funny stuff right here, considering the Dems are planning to run Kamala Harris and Kanye West.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DietCoke

 

One wonders whether the presidency can recover, or whether we’re doomed to live in an endless cycle of lowbrow celebrity autocracy—America remade in the image of Italy’s Silvio Berlusconi.

mikec

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Reply with quote  #3839 

You quote Prsobiec as a source - hahahahahhahahahahha.

Talk about #fakenews - that guy wouldn't know truth if it bit him in his hind quarters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by uwApoligist

Seems like shenanigans on the part of Lynch/odummer.  She snuck the Russian lawyer in and then shopped her around with offers of salacious information on Clinton.  Several senators met with her, several representatives were contacted/met, on both the dem and the republican side.

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepavlich/2017/07/14/thats-odd-loretta-lynch-granted-russian-lawyer-us-entry-after-visa-was-denied-n2354594

In addition to trying entrap Trump and other republicans with Russian nothingburger bullsh1t.  They used the meeting to justify the FISA warrant for tapping Manifort and likely other campaign officials phones.  They had an open mic at the meeting the entire time.  They also used it to unmask Trump campaign officials. 

https://medium.com/@JackPosobiec/breaking-lynch-ordered-manaforts-phone-tapped-during-veselnitskaya-meeting-363824284be8

TheNarrator

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Reply with quote  #3840 
Come on Mike, this is the crew that is blaming the Secret Service for allowing Donnie boy and crew to meet with the Russians.

High info they are not.
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