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OldWiseOne

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by outofzone


Give a scenario when when non-athletic money counts towards Athletic Money. That's a new one for me.


In order for academic money to not count against scholarship limits, not only must it be based solely on academic requirements but the SA must also meet certain academic standards set forth by the NCAA. For example, the SA must meet one of the 3 following academic requirements for an academic scholarship no not count...have a HS GPA of 3.5 or higher (total GPA, not just core), achieve a certain score on the SAT/ACT or be in the top 10% of their graduating class.

Another situation involves the continuing requirements. I had One scholarship we used that only required a 2.75 GPA to maintain but the NCAA requires a 3.0 GPA.

There are a lot of little rules.
3leftturns

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by outofzone


Give a scenario when when non-athletic money counts towards Athletic Money. That's a new one for me.
Yeah... not gonna happen
PH2

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Reply with quote  #33 
On the out of state/in state tuition thing, I negotiated separate percentages depending on whether my daughter would qualify for the out of state waiver. That's what they may be basing the offer on here - X% assuming she qualifies for the waiver and pays the in-state rate.

In my dd's case, it was basically a full scholarship if she got the waiver. If not, I was capping the amount the school would pay because a full out of state would have cost them too much to offer her. She hit the ACT/GPA marks she needed, and she's basically getting a full ride between the athletic and academic money. But you may want to confirm what the offer is if she is a true OOS student because it sounds like they are assuming she'd qualify for the in-state rate.
OldWiseOne

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Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by outofzone
TOTAL COST - $30,000 in-state                                    Total Cost - $50,000 out-of-state
Tuition - $12,000/$30,000 = .40                                  Tuition - $32,000/$50,000 = .64
Fees - $900/$30,000 = .03                                          Fees - $900/$50,000 = .02
Books - $900/$30,000 = .03                                        Books - $900/$50,000 = .02
Housing - $6,000/$30,000 = .20                                  Housing - $6,000/$50,000 = .12
Food - $4,500/$30,000 = .15                                       Food - $4,500/$50,000 = .09
COA - $5,700/$30,000 = .19                                       COA - $5,700/$50,000 = .11





While a Full Ride player would get all 6 above, it's my understanding that a player on any amount of Athletic Money would receive the COA...?

You are correct in some instances. Every school that has the COA as part of their scholarship package awards the COA differently. You are correct that some schools do require ALL SA regardless of how much athletic aid they are on receives the COA. But there are other schools who leave it simply as 1 of the 6 parts that may be awarded in full or in parts. Both are legal.
outofzone

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Reply with quote  #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldWiseOne


In order for academic money to not count against scholarship limits, not only must it be based solely on academic requirements but the SA must also meet certain academic standards set forth by the NCAA. For example, the SA must meet one of the 3 following academic requirements for an academic scholarship no not count...have a HS GPA of 3.5 or higher (total GPA, not just core), achieve a certain score on the SAT/ACT or be in the top 10% of their graduating class.

Another situation involves the continuing requirements. I had One scholarship we used that only required a 2.75 GPA to maintain but the NCAA requires a 3.0 GPA.

There are a lot of little rules.


sounds like you're referencing Academic money that ANY student can qualify for. Athletes come under the same scrutiny as the regular student body. 
outofzone

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Reply with quote  #36 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3leftturns
Yeah... not gonna happen


I'm inclined to believe that also, especially within the P5 programs. While possible, don't imagine many Coaches would jeopardize pure Athletic dollars in that manner. 
MAXX

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Posts: 118
Reply with quote  #37 

The following is how the NCAA determines whether or not an academic merit scholarship would be countable during the student-athlete’s freshman year:

NCAA Bylaw 15.5.3.2.4.1 (Academic Honor Awards -- Based on High School Record): Academic honor awards that are part of an institution’s normal arrangements for academic scholarships, based solely on the recipient’s high school record and awarded independently of athletics interests and in amounts consistent with the pattern of all such awards made by institutions, are exempt from an institution’s equivalency computation, provided the recipient was ranked in the upper 10 percent of the high school graduating class or achieved a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.500 (based on a maximum of 4.000) or a minimum ACT sum score of 105 or a minimum SAT score of 1200 (critical reading and math) for SAT tests taken before March 1, 2016; or a minimum SAT score of 1270 (critical reading and math) for tests taken on or after March 1, 2016, based on the concordance determined by the College Board.

Prowler

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Reply with quote  #38 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldWiseOne
Each school will do it differently and it all depends on the budget. Some schools will give X amount of dollars and the coach can spend it how they want. Other schools will push for/require a certain number of in-state kids to limit costs and other schools will let the coach bring in whoever they want and over budget in the scholarship area knowing that it will fluctuate each year depending on the number of in-state and out-of-state kids.


Lot of variables here: I know of one DII school near a state border that offers in-state tuitioni to in-state kids AND those of a collection of counties in the border state (those on the state line and once-removed from the state line). And also, in athletics at least, for recruits from a section of another bordering state on the far corner of the state (as in about as far as you can get from the school) ... because it’s a recruiting hotbed for them in many sports.
ucrmom

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Posts: 23
Reply with quote  #39 
It also depends on how they write it up. Example, my daughter and niece both got full scholarships to different schools. My daughters scholarship had a yearly dollar amount. My nieces scholarship just said 4 years. ( both were renewable annually) Both girls were at a UC school.

Each year, the tuition at my daughter's school went up. Making her "Full ride" not so full any more.  My niece however because her's was written up as a 4 year scholarship with no dollar amount didn't have the same problem. 

Morale of the story, make sure they don't put a dollar amount(just 4 free years) if you get a free ride! lol

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3leftturns

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Reply with quote  #40 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ucrmom
It also depends on how they write it up. Example, my daughter and niece both got full scholarships to different schools. My daughters scholarship had a yearly dollar amount. My nieces scholarship just said 4 years. ( both were renewable annually) Both girls were at a UC school.

Each year, the tuition at my daughter's school went up. Making her "Full ride" not so full any more.  My niece however because her's was written up as a 4 year scholarship with no dollar amount didn't have the same problem. 

Morale of the story, make sure they don't put a dollar amount(just 4 free years) if you get a free ride! lol
Yes.... have it be a percentage
azure

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Reply with quote  #41 
My daughter started with a percentage of tuition but I found it really was a dollar amount not a percentage of the actual tuition.  However, when she was moved to an athletic full ride, 'everything' was included included the housing check.  At Oregon, at that time, the fifth year was covered at the rate at the end of the fourth year so her full ride continued through that last year.  I always knew she would need five years, I just didn't know how it would be paid.

3LT is right, Eugene is hard to travel to.  As we were from the Seattle area, we drove the 5-6 hours to get there.

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34sDad

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Posts: 170
Reply with quote  #42 
DD's school stopped awarding percentages in 2015 and went to fixed amounts.  They claimed it was to make things easier on parents to know exactly how much they're getting.  Gee, thanks!  Not sure how many other schools did the same.  
outofzone

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Reply with quote  #43 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 34sDad
DD's school stopped awarding percentages in 2015 and went to fixed amounts.  They claimed it was to make things easier on parents to know exactly how much they're getting.  Gee, thanks!  Not sure how many other schools did the same.  


Guess they call that scholarship depreciation...
spazsdad

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Posts: 7,337
Reply with quote  #44 
UC Davis tried the fixed dollar amount a few years back. Not sure if they still do,it.
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3leftturns

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Reply with quote  #45 
I wonder how you hand out four-year schollies with anything other than a percentage
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