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Softball_rules5

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Posts: 152
Reply with quote  #1 
So what will be the new points of emphasis or rules after the NFCA convention this year? Last year they mucked up the game with the slapper rule. What wonders will they come up with this year?
Devin22

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Reply with quote  #2 
I think they are requiring shorts...Daisy duke shorts for players...
PH2

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Reply with quote  #3 
I hope they clarify the obstruction call at home plate because I saw a few instances last year that showed the umps have no clue what obstruction is.  I saw calls where the umps were basically deciding that if the ball beat the runner to the plate, the catcher had to be called for obstruction.
no_ties

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Reply with quote  #4 
FYI

For this year, it seems the focus is back on the pitcher and their taking the signal. (See below)

2018 and 2019 NCAA Softball Official Rules Interpretations, Clarifications and Situations
Vickie Van Kleeck, Secretary-Rules Editor
Last Updated 9/14/18

Rule   Date      Interpretation/Clarification/Situation

10.2   9/14/18 TAKING THE SIGNAL (RULES 10.2.1 and 10.2.2)

Before starting a pitch, all pitchers, whether taking a visual signal from a coach or player, referring to a signal arm band, or taking no signal at all, must:
• Have both feet in contact with the pitcher’s plate (10.2.1.1),
• Have her hands separated (10.2.1.2), and
• Pause for a noticeable stop of two seconds (10.2.2).
• If a pitcher is taking a visual signal from a coach or player, this needs to be done while she is in contact with the pitcher’s plate.
• If a pitcher is taking a signal from an arm band, this needs to be done while she is in contact with the pitcher’s plate.
• If the pitcher is not taking a visual signal from a coach or player or referring to a signal arm band, she still must comply with Rules 10.2.1 and 10.2.2, which includes pausing for two seconds while in contact with the pitcher’s plate and hands separated before bringing her hands together to start the pitch.
• Any time a pitcher takes a signal from somewhere other than the pitcher’s plate with hands separated, it is an illegal pitch, unless she also takes another signal while in the position required in Rule 10.2.1.
• Following this procedure will ensure that pitchers will pause once they step on the pitcher’s plate with both feet prior to bringing their hands together.

TWO SECOND PAUSE WITH HANDS SEPARATED (RULE 10.2.2) 

The plate umpire has his/her hand up indicating “time” because the batter is not positioned and ready in the batter’s box. During this “time out” the pitcher’s hands must be separated. When the umpire’s hand drops to indicate that the batter is ready, the pitcher can take a signal from the catcher or her signal arm band or she can bring her hands together and pitch without having to pause for two seconds.

UPDATED CASE BOOK PLAYS BASED ON THESE INTERPRETATIONS:

Taking the Signal

A.R. 10-1. 1) The pitcher puts her front foot on the pitcher’s plate and looks to the catcher who, by her hand/arm movements, apparently gives the pitcher the signal or 2) the pitcher puts her front foot on the pitcher’s plate and looks at her signal arm band. The pitcher then steps on the pitcher’s plate with her rear foot assuming a legal position, brings her hands together and begins the pitch. Is this a legal pitch? RULING: Illegal pitch in both 1) and 2). The pitcher is not restricted to taking only one signal. She can stand as described and receive a pitching signal. But she must then take another signal in the position described in Rule 10.2.1 (that is, both feet on the pitcher's plate, hands separated, and the ball in one hand) when she pauses. This required position alerts the batter and umpire that she is about to bring her hands together, separate them and deliver the pitch. (Rule 10.2)

A.R. 10-2. The pitcher steps on the pitcher’s plate with both feet, her hands apart, and gets the sign from the dugout. She then brings her hands together, pauses, looks to the catcher or her signal arm band and receives additional signs. Is this additional apparent sign illegal? RULING: No. The first part satisfies the requirements in Rule 10.2 for taking the signal. She must pause with her hands together for not more than five seconds, but the rule does not specify what else she can do during that time so, yes, she can receive additional signals during those five seconds. (Rule 10.2)

A.R. 10-3. The pitcher likes to work very quickly and in order to give the batter time to be set, the umpire often needs to suspend play by putting a hand up. Once the batter is set and the umpire’s arm lowers, the pitcher immediately brings her hands together and begins her pitch. The question is while the umpire uses the "do not pitch" signal, can the pitcher take her signal and then as the arm lowers, bring her hands together and continue with her pitch OR must she wait to take her signal until after the umpire lowers his arm? RULING: The pitcher must take her signal once the umpire signals play ball or lowers his/her arm indicating readiness for play. (Rule 10.2)

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Softball_rules5

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Posts: 152
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by no_ties
FYI

For this year, it seems the focus is back on the pitcher and their taking the signal. (See below)

2018 and 2019 NCAA Softball Official Rules Interpretations, Clarifications and Situations
Vickie Van Kleeck, Secretary-Rules Editor
Last Updated 9/14/18

Rule   Date      Interpretation/Clarification/Situation

10.2   9/14/18 TAKING THE SIGNAL (RULES 10.2.1 and 10.2.2)

Before starting a pitch, all pitchers, whether taking a visual signal from a coach or player, referring to a signal arm band, or taking no signal at all, must:
• Have both feet in contact with the pitcher’s plate (10.2.1.1),
• Have her hands separated (10.2.1.2), and
• Pause for a noticeable stop of two seconds (10.2.2).
• If a pitcher is taking a visual signal from a coach or player, this needs to be done while she is in contact with the pitcher’s plate.
• If a pitcher is taking a signal from an arm band, this needs to be done while she is in contact with the pitcher’s plate.
• If the pitcher is not taking a visual signal from a coach or player or referring to a signal arm band, she still must comply with Rules 10.2.1 and 10.2.2, which includes pausing for two seconds while in contact with the pitcher’s plate and hands separated before bringing her hands together to start the pitch.
• Any time a pitcher takes a signal from somewhere other than the pitcher’s plate with hands separated, it is an illegal pitch, unless she also takes another signal while in the position required in Rule 10.2.1.
• Following this procedure will ensure that pitchers will pause once they step on the pitcher’s plate with both feet prior to bringing their hands together.

TWO SECOND PAUSE WITH HANDS SEPARATED (RULE 10.2.2) 

The plate umpire has his/her hand up indicating “time” because the batter is not positioned and ready in the batter’s box. During this “time out” the pitcher’s hands must be separated. When the umpire’s hand drops to indicate that the batter is ready, the pitcher can take a signal from the catcher or her signal arm band or she can bring her hands together and pitch without having to pause for two seconds.

UPDATED CASE BOOK PLAYS BASED ON THESE INTERPRETATIONS:

Taking the Signal

A.R. 10-1. 1) The pitcher puts her front foot on the pitcher’s plate and looks to the catcher who, by her hand/arm movements, apparently gives the pitcher the signal or 2) the pitcher puts her front foot on the pitcher’s plate and looks at her signal arm band. The pitcher then steps on the pitcher’s plate with her rear foot assuming a legal position, brings her hands together and begins the pitch. Is this a legal pitch? RULING: Illegal pitch in both 1) and 2). The pitcher is not restricted to taking only one signal. She can stand as described and receive a pitching signal. But she must then take another signal in the position described in Rule 10.2.1 (that is, both feet on the pitcher's plate, hands separated, and the ball in one hand) when she pauses. This required position alerts the batter and umpire that she is about to bring her hands together, separate them and deliver the pitch. (Rule 10.2)

A.R. 10-2. The pitcher steps on the pitcher’s plate with both feet, her hands apart, and gets the sign from the dugout. She then brings her hands together, pauses, looks to the catcher or her signal arm band and receives additional signs. Is this additional apparent sign illegal? RULING: No. The first part satisfies the requirements in Rule 10.2 for taking the signal. She must pause with her hands together for not more than five seconds, but the rule does not specify what else she can do during that time so, yes, she can receive additional signals during those five seconds. (Rule 10.2)

A.R. 10-3. The pitcher likes to work very quickly and in order to give the batter time to be set, the umpire often needs to suspend play by putting a hand up. Once the batter is set and the umpire’s arm lowers, the pitcher immediately brings her hands together and begins her pitch. The question is while the umpire uses the "do not pitch" signal, can the pitcher take her signal and then as the arm lowers, bring her hands together and continue with her pitch OR must she wait to take her signal until after the umpire lowers his arm? RULING: The pitcher must take her signal once the umpire signals play ball or lowers his/her arm indicating readiness for play. (Rule 10.2)


This would explain the 12 nonsense illegal pitches called in a fall game this year. Still see no one taking signs from the pitching rubber.
PH2

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Posts: 624
Reply with quote  #6 
They care if pitchers are in contact with the rubber before they throw a pitch, but not while they are throwing a pitch...
Softball_rules5

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Reply with quote  #7 
So hears a really stupid question, why can pitchers have almost all their foot out of the lane but as long as part is touching the line it’s legal (which no one calls anyway), they ball can be touching the line on foul side and it’s fair, but a slapper has ANY part of the foot out and they are out. I’ve heard who pushed for this rule change and if that’s true it makes sense, but again where is the consistency in rules.
Softball_rules5

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Posts: 152
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PH2
They care if pitchers are in contact with the rubber before they throw a pitch, but not while they are throwing a pitch...


Let’s just make the game more difficult to officiate. We already know the majority of the blues are really good at calling the game so let’s put rules in place that even harder to call.
BillSmith

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Posts: 6,769
Reply with quote  #9 

Why are rules written with no regard to real game situations?

The rule set published here deals with 'the pitch'. What about defense? (Yeah, I know. The language does not differentiate.)

Game situation: Runners at the corners, infield coach catches attention of catcher and non-verbally communicates the defensive tactic to be applied. While hurler is off the pitcher's plate and is bouncing the resin bag in palm, glances at the catcher as she wigwams a signal to infielders.

No problem as yet, no violation of 10.2.1

However, head coach is the pitching signal caller. Holds up four fingers and indicates desire to walk the batter to load the bases. Pitcher steps, toes the pitcher's plate and...

Violation, but...

No penalty. They are walking the batter anyway. Hahahahahaha! Gotchya.

Coaches, in the case you communicated to pitcher all necessary information before the next pitch, have a dummy signal.

Scenario-

As above, signal for the first and third requires an automatic pitchout, as you are running a backdoor play at third. Pitcher needs to fulfill rule requirement, so catch her attention and give a planned, bogus signal to pitcher, WHEN SHE IS ON THE PITCHER'S PLATE.

Yes, I over analyze.


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Softball_rules5

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Posts: 152
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillSmith

Why are rules written with no regard to real game situations?

The rule set published here deals with 'the pitch'. What about defense? (Yeah, I know. The language does not differentiate.)

Game situation: Runners at the corners, infield coach catches attention of catcher and non-verbally communicates the defensive tactic to be applied. While hurler is off the pitcher's plate and is bouncing the resin bag in palm, glances at the catcher as she wigwams a signal to infielders.

No problem as yet, no violation of 10.2.1

However, head coach is the pitching signal caller. Holds up four fingers and indicates desire to walk the batter to load the bases. Pitcher steps, toes the pitcher's plate and...

Violation, but...

No penalty. They are walking the batter anyway. Hahahahahaha! Gotchya.

Coaches, in the case you communicated to pitcher all necessary information before the next pitch, have a dummy signal.

Scenario-

As above, signal for the first and third requires an automatic pitchout, as you are running a backdoor play at third. Pitcher needs to fulfill rule requirement, so catch her attention and give a planned, bogus signal to pitcher, WHEN SHE IS ON THE PITCHER'S PLATE.

Yes, I over analyze.



Completely understand this scenario but again let’s just make game play more difficult. It may not have been caught above but when I said our blues doing a great job was a bit sarcastic filled. So make it even harder for them to call.
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