Ultimate College Softball
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Fresh

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Reply with quote  #31 
LOL. Well..........exxccuuuuuuuuuuussee me. It explained your comment. 
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nolefan

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjs4585


Because although those from PUR are US citizens, the other way around is not true. PUR citizenship requires at least a grandparent to be a native citizen of PUR (at least those are the rules as they were explained to me). There are other ways to become a citizen as well but US citizens are not automatically Puerto Rican citizens.


While all other countries (including the U.S., Mexico, Canada, and all other Americas teams) requires a parent to be a native of a country for their daughter to become an eligible citizen (and hold a passport of that country), they follow the same rules except PR allows a native connection to a grandparent (vs. parent, as noted). That means any softball player with a connection to PR could qualify to play for them. You don't have to be a PR citizen and hold a PR passport as all Puerto Rico citizens are U.S. citizens and as the Olympics considers PR to be an insular country you only need to hold a U.S. passport to be eligible to play for PR at the Olympics. That's the information WBSC provided to me. None of the countries are breaking any of the rules but perhaps "stretching" it to accommodate more athletes in order to make their teams more competitive so they can get a berth to the Olympics. In the short term that will work - long term definitely not good for the future of softball at the Olympics as we'd be back to U.S. domination of the sport which was the main reason it was dropped after 2008. 


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nolefan

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Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauren


Yup.

Honestly I’m beyond pissed there’s going to be 3 North American teams at the Olympics. Half the field!

Honestly have one from Europe, America and Asia/Oceania.

Then sides coming second all play off.

Because the way it’s going you’re going to have the world number 8 or 9 at the Olympics and potentially not 3 or 4.


They originally suggested the top 4 finishers from the recent Worlds (including Japan) would get a berth and then the remaining 2 spots would be open competition in 2019 based on the continents not represented. If that held, then Japan, US, Canada and Australia would have earned the berths. Then regional berths would have been opened up for the continents not already represented (which would have meant no more teams from the Americas for sure). Then someone came up with these "regional" berths to ensure there was competition from every continent. That only works as long as the continents are equally matched, which of course they're not. After the results of the recent worlds I think their original plan would have been the fairer one - which also would have meant that 4 teams got a chance to strengthen their teams for 2020 rather than only 2. So, regardless of how pissed we may be the qualifying rules are as is.

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spazsdad

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Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fresh
LOL. Well..........exxccuuuuuuuuuuussee me. It explained your comment. 

It did no such thing. Just saying it’s an exhibition sport does not give any insight to the structure of the event

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TheNarrator

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Reply with quote  #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fresh
It's an exhibition sport. Be glad we're there at all.


The olympics do not offer exhibition sports.  They are called demonstration sports and baseball and softball are not among them.  They are part of the current summer program like any other sport.  While baseball has been an demonstration sport, softball has not.  They were included in the 2020 Olympic program by vote of the IOC at the behest of the host country.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olympic_sports#Demonstration_summer_sports
cjs4585

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Reply with quote  #36 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolefan


While all other countries (including the U.S., Mexico, Canada, and all other Americas teams) requires a parent to be a native of a country for their daughter to become an eligible citizen (and hold a passport of that country), they follow the same rules except PR allows a native connection to a grandparent (vs. parent, as noted). That means any softball player with a connection to PR could qualify to play for them. You don't have to be a PR citizen and hold a PR passport as all Puerto Rico citizens are U.S. citizens and as the Olympics considers PR to be an insular country you only need to hold a U.S. passport to be eligible to play for PR at the Olympics. That's the information WBSC provided to me. None of the countries are breaking any of the rules but perhaps "stretching" it to accommodate more athletes in order to make their teams more competitive so they can get a berth to the Olympics. In the short term that will work - long term definitely not good for the future of softball at the Olympics as we'd be back to U.S. domination of the sport which was the main reason it was dropped after 2008. 



The Olympics requires participants to be citizens of the country they represent. I didnt know pur was exempt from this as an "insular" country. Thanks for that. Yeah, the us dominance is a concern. My point was just that it's likely something will be worked out because they arent going to have it in 2020, not in 2024 and then back again in 2028.

I know countries get around the citizenship thing as well. There are several documented instances of "the skids being greased" for athletes in relation to getting citizenship.
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