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sabercatcorner

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'll be a sophomore in high school next year.  I want to play softball in college and then be a nurse.  I'm looking for colleges that have good nursing programs and softball teams.  Does anybody have any suggestions?

playa

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Reply with quote  #2 

Think D2, or small D1 colleges because most D1 coaches will NOT allow a playa to miss any of their practices or games for classes or clinics; Good Luck!

BamaHoHo

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Reply with quote  #3 
Alabama has a pretty good School of Nursing.
BillSmith

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Reply with quote  #4 
Familiar with neighbors, friends, clients and some ball players who have graduated from various nursing programs.

To my knowledge, all of the California State University campuses that have softball, also have nursing programs. Cheap if you live in-state.

Seattle University sports both and is well-received in nursing circles.

However, as has been stated in this thread and often on this forum, nursing is a difficult major to complete while playing softball. The labs and practical portion of the curriculum runs counter to practice and game times. Something will have to give.

G'luck in your decision and career.

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Anutherfan

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Reply with quote  #5 
Plan on taking 5 or more years to complete.  In that case a school that offers more than 4 years of aid would be desirable.  In addition, plan on taking many summer classes which must be the lab or practicals.  Check to see if the school(s) will pay for summer school.  Then lastly check all schools that are ok with your major, e.g. Hawaii Pacific (Division II) was ok with it a few years back.
LMUfan

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Reply with quote  #6 
Talking to my wife who works in a doctor's office and it should be noted that to be an RN does not require a college degree.
lakeh

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Reply with quote  #7 

Florida has some schools that were formerly Junior Colleges that are now four year schools. They still play a junior college schedule for two years. If you decide to continue in nursing you could play softball for two years and finish your nursing degree without being obligated to a team in your junior and senior years. If you decided to change your major you could transfer to a four year school and continue playing softball. I know at least a couple of these schools offer nursing. The one potential problem is you would not have any athletic scholarship money available the last two years of school. On the other hand, these schools have significant athletic aid for the two years you would be playing.


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Bill Horton
SBLL

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Reply with quote  #8 
There are three nursing students on the UL Ragin' Cajun starting nine.   It is a very difficult major; the regular students don't have a life.  Add to that, the work involved in being an athlete, you've got NO time to breathe.  You learn how to balance your time and prioritize your goals.  "Where there is a will, there is a way."  There are ways to work around clinicals and each case is different. 
http://www.louisiana.edu/Advancement/PRNS/news/2009/131.shtml for information about the nursing program at ULL.  It's one of the best! 

btw

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"Talking to my wife who works in a doctor's office and it should be noted that to be an RN does not require a college degree."

LMU Wife is wrong. Need at least an AA degree to apply to take California State Boards. Very difficult to get get hired without BSN.
LMUfan

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by btw
"Talking to my wife who works in a doctor's office and it should be noted that to be an RN does not require a college degree."

LMU Wife is wrong. Need at least an AA degree to apply to take California State Boards. Very difficult to get get hired without BSN.


Sorry, I was referring to a bachelor's degree.  My bad.
azure

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Reply with quote  #11 
There are other majors that a major d1 athlete cannot do.

U Oregon's teaching program requires a lot of time in the classroom.  Not a college classroom but in a regular school.  You cannot do this with the travel demands of a Pac 10 school. 

They can't count on you to be in the classroom when you have to travel for several days/week

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LMUfan

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProudDad
Quote:
Originally Posted by azure
There are other majors that a major d1 athlete cannot do.

U Oregon's teaching program requires a lot of time in the classroom.  Not a college classroom but in a regular school.  You cannot do this with the travel demands of a Pac 10 school. 

They can't count on you to be in the classroom when you have to travel for several days/week

Azure - That's why my daughter is doing her student teaching in her fifth year.



Yes, one of my daughters did that also.  She got an undergrad degree and then got her credential and masters in the fifth year.  Her undergrad school, SF State, didn't have an Education major.

I've always thought this was the normal way to get a teaching credential...in the fifth year.   My daughters had many student teachers in their elementary school over the cumulative 11 years they attended and the student teachers were always grad students.
3xsbmom

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Reply with quote  #13 

Isn't Creighton known for it's excellent nursing program.  I'll bet they work with their student-athletes to get through the nursing programs and still participate in sports.  Anyone know for sure?

3xsbmom

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Reply with quote  #14 

I know how it works in most places - my daughter played PAC 10 ball and she was definitely limited in what courses she could take.  My question was about Creighton in particular - does anyone have info about that since the question was about nursing and what schools would be sensitive to the STUDENT-athlete.

midodd

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Reply with quote  #15 
My DD is a 2011 and also wants to be a nurse.  Some colleges will not recruit due to the major, others talk about other majors, while some will discuss summer school and a 5th year.  Some DI schools have pushed their school of nursing as a recruiting tool.  You can take other majors and then pick up the clinical part after you graduate to get your BSN.

I tell my DD that you will be a nurse a lot longer than a softball player. 
ken001b

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Reply with quote  #16 

Fairfield and Villanova have two of the best nursing programs in the country...

oldscout

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Reply with quote  #17 
Valparaiso University I know had 2-3 players get nursing degree.D-1 program,but smaller school enrollment of around 3-4000.

Be sure to check out this school,SB program is on the rise as well.

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midodd

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Reply with quote  #18 

As my dd is facing this problem, we have addressed it with a couple of coaches and academic advisors.  DD is willing to do a five year program.  If you take the last year of clinics for nurses after softball and break the labs into fall and summer for the junior year plus a couple of addiional classes for a minor, nursing is not to difficult to fit in softball at the D1 level.  Since most college grads take 4+ years to graduate without a sport.

swinghardincaseyouhitit

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Reply with quote  #19 
Research you schools very carefully.  There are a lot of universities that have a severe conflict with their nursing program and athletic teams.  Each coach may be different but in many instances the time conflict is so great that a college coach would have to allow you to miss practice 2-3 or even sometimes 3-4 times a week and not many will.  Your first two years will usually be ok but the last two are nexst to impossible, at a lot of universities.

As several others have suggested, make sure to research both the softball program and nursing program.  Ask a athletic department academic advisor if any other athletes are nursing majors.  If he/she says no and the coach says that they can work around it then I would be a little suspicious.

I know from the schools I used to coach at we would've had to have pracitices at night in order to accomodate a nursing major and that wasn't possible.


midodd

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Reply with quote  #20 
Actually had academic adviser run a schedule for all five years.  As you say in your post the first two years are ok.  Junior year fall, classes are okay, junior year spring no nursing labs, Summer school for missing clinics, senior year fall okay, senior year spring no labs and 5th year to finish nursing program.

Ran the schedule by the nursing department and they made a couple of changes that made the schedule even more doable.  Bottom line, it is hard to take some nursing classes during your Junior and Senior Spring semester and play softball, so you just have to take them at different times to make it work.
toroman

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Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by midodd

As my dd is facing this problem, we have addressed it with a couple of coaches and academic advisors.  DD is willing to do a five year program.  If you take the last year of clinics for nurses after softball and break the labs into fall and summer for the junior year plus a couple of addiional classes for a minor, nursing is not to difficult to fit in softball at the D1 level.  Since most college grads take 4+ years to graduate without a sport.

I know 3 players (same year on team) that were not able to get through nursing school while playing.  "Nothing is impossible to the determined" but most would agree ..... IT IS DIFFICULT to fit in softball at the D1 level.  above the ULL poster explains those kids don't have time to breathe.

dumb_parent

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Reply with quote  #22 

Unless the economy turns around many programs especially in CA are cancelling or limiting summer classes.  Also many classes are just not offered in the summer.

vcaldwell

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Reply with quote  #23 
Great  question regarding Nursing and athletics. As the husband of a nurse who then went on to become a doctor and as a coach who has had three players go into nursing I'd like to share some observations.

* Unless you are planning from the start to go into high level administration which school you go to for your BSN doesn't really matter. Why? Firstly, the standards of what is taught is pretty much determined by what the state boards require on the RN exam which are mandated by national board of nursing and very similar state to state. Secondly, the demand for trained nurses is so high most employers couldn't care less where you went to school as long as it's accredited and you passed your state RN exam.
* It is VERY tough to study nursing and play any sport. Mainly because of the clinic time and science labs. However it CAN be done.You need an understanding coach who believes you are there to get an education not just there to help her/him keep their job and an understanding Dean of Nursing who is willing to help you get your clinical time in. My players all did clinical during the fall to minimize missed practice time. Most lab sciences were done during the summer.
* When researching a school look at all womens sports and see how many Nursing majors there are. Contact a couple and ask them what challenges they have and how good the school and athletic department is in helping work it out. If asked most coaches will put young students in touch with athletes looking for general info and most athletes will share info with young players. Choose sports other than your sport. Save that for when you are serious. EDIT: about that particular school and wanting to play your sport there.
* Unfortunately if you want a D1 major or top D2 program it will be tough to find a coach willing to help unless you are a stud player. There are schools out there that are the exception to that. Midwestern State, Henderson State, ULL, Arkansas and Kansas have all to my knowledge had players complete BSN's while playing.

It all comes down to why you are going to school; to get an education that will benefit you the rest of your life OR to play ball at a big name school for 4 years. Unless you are an uber-stud (of which there are only a handful every year) then I offer the same advice I have offered my kids for years.... pick the school for the school and the education you'll get; playing softball is a bonus and if you can get some money to help pay for it that's a double bonus. I have only had one player leave a school where she started and that one didn't follow my advice. All of the others have/are enjoying their college experience (including play softball) and have/will graduate with an education. From NAIA up to D1 majors.

JMHO,
Vic

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