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AtlUmpSteve

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Rule Rule Change and Rationale

New 2.28, 12.5.5 and new 12.17.1.5.2

Require the runner’s lane be drawn on the field and all associated rules apply.
New Rule 2.28
The runner’s lane is the area that is the last half of the distance between home plate and first base where a batterrunner must run to avoid interfering with a fielder’s attempt to receive a thrown ball. It is bounded by a 30-foot line drawn in foul territory parallel to and 3 feet from the first-base line, starting at a point halfway between home plate and the back edge of first base. (See diagram at end of rule.) If the infield is skinned, it is recommended the runner’s lane be skinned.

New Rule 12.5.5
When either of her feet is completely outside the runner’s lane, in contact with the ground, and, in the judgment of the umpire, she interferes with the fielder taking the throw at first base. Exception: She may run outside the runner’s lane: (1) if she has not yet reached the start of the runner’s lane; (2) to avoid a fielder attempting to field a batted ball; (3) or if she leaves the lane on her last stride in order to touch first base. EFFECT—See Rule 12.17.1.5.2.

New Rule 12.17.1.5.2
The batter-runner may not run outside the runner’s lane and, in the umpire’s judgment, interfere with the fielder taking the throw at first base. Exception: The batter-runner may run outside the runner’s lane: (1) if she has not yet reached the start of the runner’s lane; (2) to avoid a fielder attempting to field a batted ball; (3) or if she leaves the lane on her last stride in order to touch first base.

New Note 2 The batter-runner is considered outside the runner’s lane if either foot is completely outside either line and in contact with the ground.

EFFECT—The ball is dead, the batter-runner is out, and each base runner must return to the last base occupied at the time of the pitch. If the interference, in the umpire’s judgment, is an obvious attempt to prevent a double play, the base runner closest to home plate shall also be called out.

Rationale: In removing the requirement to draw the runner’s lane on the field and the language referencing the lane, the rule was inadvertently and fundamentally changed. Runners no longer had a protected area to run from home to first. The intent of that rule was to prevent the runner from interfering with the defensive player receiving the ball at first base and could not be applied correctly without the runner’s lane.
3.3.1.1 and 3.3.1.1.2
The bat barrel, taper and handle shall be of one piece or multi-piece permanently assembled or two-piece interchangeable barrel construction. Delete 3.3.1.1.2.

Rationale: The interchangeable barrel bat design was abandoned by the manufacturer.

3.3.1.7.2
The bat shall have a knob of a minimum of ¼ inch protruding at a degree angle of 90 or less from the handle. It may be molded, lathed, welded or adjustable, but must be permanently fastened. A “flare” or “cone” grip attached to the bat will be considered altered. The knob may be taped or marked for identification as long as there is no violation of this section. The knob may be solid or hollowed out to house an embedded metric sensor. If a sensor is used it shall (1) not affect performance; (2) be secured by a locking mechanism and a back-up mechanism to keep it in place; and (3) have a distinguishing "off line" mode to prevent data from being accessed during a game.

Rationale: Bats with adjustable knobs allow hitters to use one bat and have the benefit of adjusting the knob to different lengths to provide hand stability that a traditional knob provides, but do not provide any type of unfair advantage. The metric sensor allows for the increased advances in technology of bat construction and will offer hitters feedback on their swing after the game.

3.7.2 and 3.8.3.1
A defensive player may wear a helmet. If more than one player wears a helmet, the helmets must be the same color. Highly reflective, mirror-like chrome-finish helmets of any color are prohibited. Helmets shall have a nonglossy finish.

Rationale: The highly reflective, mirror-like chrome-finish helmets are prohibited to be worn by offensive players, and the same prohibition should be on defensive players, too.

4.10
Game officials who are hired contracted to rule on the plays of the game shall be the plate umpire and a base umpire(s) one or two base umpires.

Rationale: Allows for additional base umpires to be used.

5.3.4
Maintenance of the field before and during games shall be the responsibility of the home-team management. The home team may hand drag/rake the field after a complete inning, provided it does not delay the start of the next inning. Additional in-game field maintenance may shall only be at the direction of be requested by the umpire(s).

Rationale: Improves the playing surface for the safety and well-being of the student-athletes and does not delay playing time.

5.5
The umpires should report to the field and notify the on-site administrator and home-team coaches of their arrival at least one hour 45 minutes before the start of the game.

Rationale: Common practice update. Some of the umpires’ duties already suggest they should be arriving an hour before the start of the game.

5.9.8
Team personnel, including players, are prohibited from wearing any device capable of transmitting information while on the field (e.g., cell phone, smart watch, etc.).

Rationale: Personnel is prohibited from accessing or retrieving data during the game. This will ensure these devices are not being used inappropriately.

New 6.7 and 6.12
6.7
Media Format The following media format shall be used in televised games, or may be used by mutual agreement between the two teams or by conference or tournament policy. 6.7.1 Teams are allowed a maximum of 2 minutes between innings and at the start of the game for warm-ups. Rules 6.5.4.1 through 6.5.4.3 and 6.6.6.1 through 6.6.6.4 still apply, except that during this time, the pitcher is allowed to throw any number of warm-up pitches. She may still only throw to first base once.

6.7.1.1
The time limit may be shortened by mutual agreement between the two teams or by conference or tournament policy.

6.7.1.2
If a television agreement requires a longer time limit between innings and at the start of the game, that time will become the maximum allowable time.

EFFECT – (6.7.1) – At the end of the time limit, if the defensive team is not ready to play, a ball will be awarded to the batter, and if the offensive team is not ready to play, a strike will be assessed to the batter.

6.7.2
Each team is allowed 7 charged conferences per regulation game. Each team is allowed 1 charged conference per half inning for each extra inning. Any remaining conferences from regulation do not carry over into extra innings. Rule 6.12 will still apply in all innings, except that in 6.12.4.1 each additional conference will count against the total of 7 charged conferences during regulation. EFFECT – The team representative(s) or player(s) who initiates an un-allowed charged conference shall be immediately ejected. (Administrative ejection; see Rule 13.2.1.)

Rationale: Variations on these changes were utilized as experimental rules during the 2017 season. Improve the flow of the game and pace of play in televised softball games.

7.1.2.2.3
When the ball goes out of play, the dead-ball appeal cannot be made until the umpire places a new ball into the game all runners must be given an opportunity to complete their base running responsibilities (advancing or returning), as determined by the umpire. Once a runner has been given sufficient time to advance or return and shows no immediate intention of doing so, a dead-ball appeal can be made. See also Rule 7.1.4.

Rationale: To provide the defense an opportunity to make a dead-ball appeal, especially on an out-of-the-park walk-off home run, when a runner(s) or the batter-runner misses home plate.

8.5.1.1 and 8.5.1.3

8.5.1.1
Any player may be substituted for at any time when the ball is dead as long as she immediately participates in the game.

8.5.1.3
A coach of the team making the substitution shall immediately notify the plate umpire at the time a substitute enters the game. A coach may make substitutes by notifying the plate umpire of the forthcoming changes. Substitutes are not required to enter the game at the time the substitution is reported to the plate umpire. Projected substitutions and re-entries are not allowed.

Rationale: Improves the flow of the game by allowing a coach to make projected substitutions. Substitutes will now be reported to the umpire without being required to immediately participate in the game, e.g., allowing a coach to report more than one change in the batting order at the beginning of the inning or re-entering the DP before her next at bat. Projected re-entries, i.e., re-entries reported while the substitute is participating (running, batting, playing defense), will continue not to be allowed.

New 9.1
9.1
No Huddle Defense After an out, the defense is allowed to throw the ball around the infield, but then must throw the ball directly to the pitcher. A team cannot huddle at the pitcher’s circle or elsewhere. EFFECT – The umpire shall warn the violator and her coach for the first offense in the game. For any subsequent offense by any member of the warned team in the same game, a ball is awarded to the batter.

Rationale: Utilized as an experimental rule during the 2017 season. Improve the flow of the game and pace of play.

9.5
9.5.1
Obstruction occurs when a defensive player, not in possession of the ball or in the act of fielding a batted ball, impedes a batter's attempt to make contact with a pitch or impedes the progress of any runner who is legally running bases on a live ball. It can be intentional or unintentional. It is obstruction if a defensive player is blocking the whole base/plate or base path without the ball and/or the runner does not have a clear path to the base/plate. (See also Rule 12.13.)

Notes: 1. Once in possession of the ball, the defensive player can be positioned between the runner and the base/plate. 2. Obstruction may be ruled even though there is no physical contact. 3. The runner may still be called out if she was clearly beaten by the throw. 4. In past years, coaches taught their players to block the base, catch the ball and make the tag. Now defensive players must catch the ball, block the base and make the tag. 5. Obstruction can occur on a force or tag play.

Delete all references to “in the act of catching”.

Rationale: To allow a base runner a clear path to the base if the defensive player is receiving a throw and does not have possession of the ball in her glove or hand. Defensive players can no longer cause the runner to alter her path to the base by blocking the base/plate or base path without the ball. Removes the vagueness of “in the act of catching” the ball.

10.2.1.1
Both feet must be on the ground in contact with the pitcher’s plate and a portion of the pivot foot must be on the top surface of the pitcher’s plate. Any part of each foot in contact with the ground or pitcher’s plate must be completely within the 24-inch length of the pitcher’s plate.

Rationale: This rule as currently written is difficult to enforce, but would still require both feet to be on the ground and in contact with the pitcher’s plate.

10.2.2
While in this position, the pitcher shall pause for a noticeable stop of at least two seconds to take or simulate taking a signal from the catcher.

Rationale: Issued as an interpretation on November 30, 2015. Ensures the pitcher has a noticeable stop/pause to allow both the batter and umpire to be ready for the pitch.

10.8 EFFECT
EFFECT - …(2) If the batter does not reach first base safely or if any runner fails to advance at least one base, the coach of the offensive team may choose the result of the play or the standard effect for an illegal pitch, which is that a ball is awarded to the batter, and each base runner advances one base. (3) If the batter is hit by an illegal pitch not swung at, the batter is awarded first base, and each other base runners advance one base, only if forced. (4) If ball four is an illegal pitch, the batter is awarded first base, and each other base runners advance one base, only if forced.

Rationale: An illegal pitch has no effect on a base runner in softball since they cannot leave the base until the pitch is released. The committee felt that awarding a ball on the batter and a one-base advance for any runner was an excessive penalty on the pitcher’s illegal action.

11.2.5, 11.15.1 and 11.21.4
At the moment of bat-ball contact, the batter may not contact the pitch when any part of her foot is touching home plate, even though she may be touching the lines of the batter’s box. In addition, the batter may not contact the pitch when her entire foot is touching the ground completely outside the lines of the batter’s box.

Rationale: It is increasingly difficult for plate umpires to assure the delivery of the pitch is legal, track the pitch, be aware of the position of the batter in the batter’s box on a hit by pitch and see if the batter has stepped completely outside the box at the point of contact. Also, ensures slappers do not gain an unfair advantage that other batters do not have by being allowed to contact the ball while outside of the batter’s box.

11.5.2
11.5.11 Note: A legally batted ball that is declared foul cannot be changed to fair regardless of additional information that might be made available to the calling umpire. Exception: Dead ball awards (i.e., out-of-the-park home run, ground rule double, and hit-by-pitch).

Rationale: A foul ball cannot be changed to a fair ball because the umpires would have to make a judgment as to where the base runner(s) would have advanced. These three exceptions have definitive base awards and therefore do not require the umpire(s) to judge where to place the runner(s). In these three instances, incorrect foul ball calls can be changed to fair/dead ball awards when additional information is made available.

12.5.9 and 12.10.3
12.5.9
The batter-runner is out when she runs the bases in reverse order, runs intentionally into the outfield between bases or runs through first base unnecessarily into the outfield on a walk, dropped third strike or any batted ball either to confuse opponents or to make a travesty of the game.

12.10.3
A runner shall not run bases in reverse order or intentionally run into the outfield between bases either to confuse the fielders or to make a travesty of the game.

Rationale: The committee believes this tactic, which involves running out of the traditional base path in order to confuse the defense, does not support the spirit and intent of the rule on the runner’s base path and makes a travesty of the game.

12.10.12 and 7.1.1.2.5.a

If a runner misses home plate and the fielder misses or makes no attempt to tag the runner, the umpire should make a safe signal and declare “No tag.” no signal, verbal or nonverbal.

Rationale: By requiring the umpire to make the safe signal, it could be confusing to the offense and they would have no reason to think they missed home plate. By the umpire making no signal, it notifies both the offense and defense that something more needs to occur before a ruling can be made.

12.13 12.13.1
When there is a collision between a runner and a fielder who is in clear possession of the ball:

12.13.1.1
If the defensive player blocks the base (plate) or baseline, the runner may slide into the base and make contact with the fielder as long as the runner is making a legitimate attempt to reach the base (plate). A legitimate attempt is making contact with the ground before reaching the base or fielder.

12.13.1.2
The runner must make an actual attempt to reach the base (plate).


12.13.1.3 The runner may not attempt to dislodge the ball from the fielder. Contact above the waist shall be judged by the umpire as an attempt by the runner to dislodge the ball.

12.13.1.4
The runner must attempt to avoid a collision if she can reach the base without colliding.

12.13.1.5
The runner must be called out if she remains on her feet and deliberately, with great force, crashes into a defensive player holding the ball and waiting to apply a tag.

EFFECT – (12.13.1.1 to 12.13.1.5) – The ball is dead. The runner is called out for deliberately crashing into a fielder, even if the ball is dislodged. If the runner deliberately crashed into a fielder holding the ball before she was put out and, in the umpire’s judgment, it was an attempt to break up an obvious double play, the offender and player being played on shall both be declared out. If the deliberate crash occurs after the runner was called out, the runner closest to home plate will also be declared out. If an obstructed runner deliberately crashes into a fielder holding the ball, the obstruction call will be ignored, and the runner will be called out.

Note: If the act is determined to be flagrant, the offender will be ejected for misconduct under Rule 13 (Behavioral ejection).

12.13.2
To prevent injury and protect the defensive player attempting to make a play on a runner, the runner must be called out if she remains on her feet and deliberately, with great force, crashes into a defensive player holding the ball and waiting to apply a tag. To prevent a deliberate crash ruling, the runner can slide, jump over the top of the defender holding the ball, go around the defender or return to the previous base touched.

Rationale: The committee continues to have concerns about collisions and is now more in line with NCAA baseball and Major League Baseball. This will ensure the health and safety of our student-athletes and provide clarity for umpires when making difficult obstruction calls.

13.2.1 EFFECT and 13.13

13.2.1 EFFECT – Ejected nonplaying personnel must leave the playing field, dugout and other team areas and be out of sight and sound. They may occupy the space near or behind the home run fence, or may leave the complex and be out of sight and sound. Out of sight and sound means unable to view the remainder of the contest and the umpires cannot hear any additional comments. In either cases, They shall not communicate (visually, electronically or verbally) further with the teams or umpires.

13.13
Suspended Personnel and Subsequent Violations

13.13.1
Suspended student-athletes shall not be in uniform, shall not be allowed in any team area from the time umpires enter the field until after they leave the field, and shall not perform any team duty while serving a suspension. Exception: Suspended student-athletes may be restricted to the dugout if the suspension is to be served while the team is on the road and no other suitable supervisory options are available.

13.13.2
Suspended coaches and other nonplaying personnel shall not communicate with any umpire or be in the playing facility once pregame activities have started until the umpires leave the field of play at the conclusion of the game(s).

EFFECT – (13.13.1 and 13.13.2) – Any violation of the conditions for the suspended person shall result in the game being forfeited.

Rationale: Clarified that ejected nonplaying team personnel cannot occupy the space near or behind the home run fence. They must leave the field or complex and be out of sight and sound. Additionally, suspended nonplaying team personnel cannot be in attendance at the site of play once pregame activities have started until the umpires leave the field of play.

3leftturns

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Reply with quote  #2 
On this one... Assuming this rule is actually saying the ump is not to signal safe until the base is touched ahead of a tag.... (this wording could stand for an editor)

FINALLY!!!

12.10.12 and 7.1.1.2.5.a

If a runner misses home plate and the fielder misses or makes no attempt to tag the runner, the umpire should make a safe signal and declare “No tag.” no signal, verbal or nonverbal.

Rationale: By requiring the umpire to make the safe signal, it could be confusing to the offense and they would have no reason to think they missed home plate. By the umpire making no signal, it notifies both the offense and defense that something more needs to occur before a ruling can be made.
3leftturns

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Reply with quote  #3 
The Lisa Fernandez rule
13.13.2
Suspended coaches and other nonplaying personnel shall not communicate with any umpire or be in the playing facility once pregame activities have started until the umpires leave the field of play at the conclusion of the game(s).

EFFECT – (13.13.1 and 13.13.2) – Any violation of the conditions for the suspended person shall result in the game being forfeited.

Rationale: Clarified that ejected nonplaying team personnel cannot occupy the space near or behind the home run fence. They must leave the field or complex and be out of sight and sound. Additionally, suspended nonplaying team personnel cannot be in attendance at the site of play once pregame activities have started until the umpires leave the field of play.
3leftturns

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Reply with quote  #4 
I wonder if this is a canary in a coal mine that officials have been directed to call illegal pitches

10.2.1.1
Both feet must be on the ground in contact with the pitcher’s plate and a portion of the pivot foot must be on the top surface of the pitcher’s plate. Any part of each foot in contact with the ground or pitcher’s plate must be completely within the 24-inch length of the pitcher’s plate.

Rationale: This rule as currently written is difficult to enforce, but would still require both feet to be on the ground and in contact with the pitcher’s plate.
Still_JAD

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Reply with quote  #5 
https://sup.arbitersports.com/Groups/104484/Library/files/2018_2019_WSB_Rules_Changes_20170817.pdf

Here is a link to the rule changes.  10.8 EFFECT is a lot clearer in the PDF version because the new rules cross out the wording where runners advance on an IP.
PDad

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Posts: 3,902
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Still_JAD
https://sup.arbitersports.com/Groups/104484/Library/files/2018_2019_WSB_Rules_Changes_20170817.pdf

Here is a link to the rule changes.  10.8 EFFECT is a lot clearer in the PDF version because the new rules cross out the wording where runners advance on an IP.

Thanks, lots of rules are clearer in the PDF - OP's post is very misleading because it shows portions that were removed as if they're still in effect.  
PDad

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Posts: 3,902
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3leftturns
On this one... Assuming this rule is actually saying the ump is not to signal safe until the base is touched ahead of a tag.... (this wording could stand for an editor)

FINALLY!!!

12.10.12 and 7.1.1.2.5.a

If a runner misses home plate and the fielder misses or makes no attempt to tag the runner, the umpire should make a safe signal and declare “No tag.” no signal, verbal or nonverbal.

Rationale: By requiring the umpire to make the safe signal, it could be confusing to the offense and they would have no reason to think they missed home plate. By the umpire making no signal, it notifies both the offense and defense that something more needs to occur before a ruling can be made.

Bold text was struck and replaced by underlined (see pdf). 
Softball_rules5

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Reply with quote  #8 
Not a fan of some of the rule changes-in the box rule, let's make it more like baseball

No huddle rule after an out-let's suck the fun and enthusiasm out of the game

I'm all for improving the game but making it a different game or sucking the fun out? It's softball, keep it that way
HeavyDuty

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Softball_rules5
Not a fan of some of the rule changes-in the box rule, let's make it more like baseball No huddle rule after an out-let's suck the fun and enthusiasm out of the game I'm all for improving the game but making it a different game or sucking the fun out? It's softball, keep it that way


That was my initial thought....to the fan out there that doesn't have much or any background in FP, the reactions I have always seen with the circle huddle, and creative theatrics that go with it, is that it's a quick bit of entertainment. Doesn't take up any more than just a few add'l seconds, if that, over just winging it around the IF, but is a nice reset for the players, and adds a bit of enthusiasm......so, let's get rid of that because the boys don't do it...terrible.   
outofzone

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Posts: 802
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Softball_rules5
Not a fan of some of the rule changes-in the box rule, let's make it more like baseball No huddle rule after an out-let's suck the fun and enthusiasm out of the game I'm all for improving the game but making it a different game or sucking the fun out? It's softball, keep it that way


I get what you're saying but some of these changes were inevitable if the game was going to progress and become more main stream. Suttle changes but, seem to be more viewer/marketing oriented & less to do with necessity. As more & more games get televised, especially nationally, I don't think Softball will garner more viewers because they like the post-out mound huddles. Also, all the theatrics batters are doing between pitches is starting to resemble what MLB went thru before they stopped that. And it's predictably filtered down to Travel Ball...and it's annoying as heck.  Advertising could potentially buy the "in game time" all the mound huddles & between pitch crap now occupies.

For example, Maddie Moss looks like a Pogo Stick after most every pitch...so the NCAA could sell advertising time to a Pogo Stick Co. That is time well "sold"?? 

Predictably, marketing dollars will drive many future game/rule changes. 
lovsofbal

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavyDuty


That was my initial thought....to the fan out there that doesn't have much or any background in FP, the reactions I have always seen with the circle huddle, and creative theatrics that go with it, is that it's a quick bit of entertainment. Doesn't take up any more than just a few add'l seconds, if that, over just winging it around the IF, but is a nice reset for the players, and adds a bit of enthusiasm......so, let's get rid of that because the boys don't do it...terrible.   


Takes up very little time. I don't see the problem. It's not like the games take forever like MLB anyway. talk about dragging a game out.
spazsdad

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Reply with quote  #12 
I think there's a problem when a 7 inning game can take over 2 hours to complete
AtlUmpSteve

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spazsdad
I think there's a problem when a 7 inning game can take over 2 hours to complete


More (most) importantly, the people that schedule TV think/believe/demand that 7 inning regular season games, other than postseason, fit into 2 hour time slots.  Anyone with a desire and a plan that more softball games be televised completely, for the benefit of the sport, and the players to be recognized as the athletes they are, has to recognize that the worst set of words ever to be heard on a softball game broadcast are "Due to time constraints, we skip ahead .....".  The NFCA (representing primarily the D1 NCAA coaches, when they speak as a voice and not for their own personal agenda) has been telling you so for the last several years, and warning that if the coaches did not fix the problem of game pace that the Rules Committee would.  Time to start to pay the Piper.  I predict MORE speed up rules will follow in the coming years.

Absolutely none of the "girls will be girls" and "suck the fun and enthusiasm" arguments add ANYTHING to the GAME.  The speed up rules are for the overall benefit of the game, not for the showmanship and gamesmanship some believe are necessary for viewers (or players) to stay engaged.
CoachZ

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Posts: 325
Reply with quote  #14 
IMHO, there are very few time killers in our game (aside from a few coaches' occasionally ridiculous time outs). The "powers that be" seem baffled by why we suddenly can't fit seven innings into 2 hours. It takes a lot longer to score 8-10 runs per game than it did to score the 1-3 runs that used to be typical in our game. They can keep cutting out the 5 seconds that it takes for people to high five in between outs, but every time they change the rules to make the strike zone smaller, nit pick the IP, or allow for hotter bats they are increasing the number of batters reaching base. It stands to reason, more people on base = longer game.
By the way, this is in no way an indictment of strike zones or IP calls. I'm just saying they can change everything else, but unless they change the number of runs being scored in a typical game at this point, they won't change the average duration of a game.
Softball_rules5

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Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlUmpSteve


More (most) importantly, the people that schedule TV think/believe/demand that 7 inning regular season games, other than postseason, fit into 2 hour time slots.  Anyone with a desire and a plan that more softball games be televised completely, for the benefit of the sport, and the players to be recognized as the athletes they are, has to recognize that the worst set of words ever to be heard on a softball game broadcast are "Due to time constraints, we skip ahead .....".  The NFCA (representing primarily the D1 NCAA coaches, when they speak as a voice and not for their own personal agenda) has been telling you so for the last several years, and warning that if the coaches did not fix the problem of game pace that the Rules Committee would.  Time to start to pay the Piper.  I predict MORE speed up rules will follow in the coming years.

Absolutely none of the "girls will be girls" and "suck the fun and enthusiasm" arguments add ANYTHING to the GAME.  The speed up rules are for the overall benefit of the game, not for the showmanship and gamesmanship some believe are necessary for viewers (or players) to stay engaged.


If we're concerned with time, then do away with the dadgum wristbands. There's your time killer. I bet if you did a comparative study, the time taken for the signal to come in, look it up on the wrist band, and then throw the pitch is far greater than the quick huddles at the mound. I get that TV will drive these changes and this should be a consideration. However, let's not forget what took this game to the level it's at and that part of that appeal is that it was different from baseball. I love both as much as anyone, but softball is a different game. Maybe keep it that way.
outofzone

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Reply with quote  #16 
Theres seems to be an echo in this forum...re-read post #10.

Wrist Bands, Post-Out huddles, between pitch routines...as Fastpitch has grown more popular all the theatrics with those things was inevitable. Actually it's a good sign as the game as grown/matured into a National Media. But things will have to change & we are just seeing the beginning. 

I watched the USA Elite Select this past wkd. Ok softball with some decent kids playing on those crap baseball fields. I did managed to catch a 2021 at bat. This player's pre-pitch routine incorporated every single cliche every MLB player has ever done before they step into the box. I wanted to throw a hand grenade at the screen. The pitcher, catcher & umpire were forced to wait for her to go thru her 10 different gyrations...from the deep breath, off set grip, tapping the plate, looking at the bat, putting her hand up, settling in & then running thru a no swing & bouncing around almost in the circle, then back to her routine. She ended up striking out looking silly on a straight fastball down the middle. People don't want to watch these Romper Room theatrics, let alone pay for it, especially if the game is going to move forward. 

Also agree the Wrist Bands probably does more to slow the game down than any single thing. If the MLB can signal from the catcher, I'm sure Colleges can also do the same...again. The whole stealing signs is completely overblown. There is too much video anymore. And if a sign is stolen, it's too late to take advantage anyway. And it will change the next inning also. No coach these days can steal enough signs to affect the outcome of any game..IMO. A pitcher can take hand signals from 3 different people for each pitch & nobody will ever know who is giving the signal or what she is throwing, unless she announces it. 

Honestly, when was the last time a player gave a post game interview & said, "...I was able to hit that walk-off HR because my coach stole the signals and I knew what she was going to throw."  Sorry, just doesn't work like that.  

All those cute & endearing little things we thought was cool during travel, won't help the game move forward in the future. And it has nothing to do with not letting the girls be girls. It's well into being a big dollar business, and with perspective, it will be good for the game.
lovsofbal

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by outofzone
Theres seems to be an echo in this forum...re-read post #10.

Wrist Bands, Post-Out huddles, between pitch routines...as Fastpitch has grown more popular all the theatrics with those things was inevitable. Actually it's a good sign as the game as grown/matured into a National Media. But things will have to change & we are just seeing the beginning. 

I watched the USA Elite Select this past wkd. Ok softball with some decent kids playing on those crap baseball fields. I did managed to catch a 2021 at bat. This player's pre-pitch routine incorporated every single cliche every MLB player has ever done before they step into the box. I wanted to throw a hand grenade at the screen. The pitcher, catcher & umpire were forced to wait for her to go thru her 10 different gyrations...from the deep breath, off set grip, tapping the plate, looking at the bat, putting her hand up, settling in & then running thru a no swing & bouncing around almost in the circle, then back to her routine. She ended up striking out looking silly on a straight fastball down the middle. People don't want to watch these Romper Room theatrics, let alone pay for it, especially if the game is going to move forward. 

QUOTE]

baseball to me is super boring to watch and I rarely watch it until the playoffs. Too many in the pitchers face, looking for the sign, spitting, etc. views on camera. I don't care to count  how many pores are in the guys face. not enough full field view of where the players are positioned.   the theatrics you mention above, isn't there a time limit how long the batter has to be set? sounds like it wasn't called, thus the batter drug out the inevitable striking out.

when the college series was on, they beat the mlb ratings unless the ESPN announcers were lying. so I'm not sure eliminating all that would make it more marketable.


outofzone

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Reply with quote  #18 
Well, keep the French Braids, hair bows & too much makeup...
Mangler

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Reply with quote  #19 
More rules is always the answer.
PBLC20

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangler
More rules is always the answer.


Exactly.  Any rules committee meeting (or legislative session) should start with the question of what rules or laws can we eliminate.
PH2

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Reply with quote  #21 
If the NCAA or MLB had the gravitas to force their games to move like little league does, it would greatly benefit everyone.  Batter has 1 foot in the box at all times, kid throws a pitch within a few seconds.  Their games move really fast.  It's also kids, but forcing the pace of the batter/pitcher interaction to speed up is where you're going to see the greatest benefit to overall time of the game, and also the fact that there's just too much time in between pitches to keep most people watching.
Kurosawa

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Reply with quote  #22 
The wrist bands are to fool-proof the process, it seems to me - both pitcher and catcher have the same wrist ban. Just ban calling pitches from the dugout. Gag Clint.

Nothing in the new rules, not even a clarification, on running out of the third-base path to elude a tag.
CajunAmos

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Reply with quote  #23 
Some help please. With the re institution of a runners lane to first, is there a limit to how far outside the runners lane a runner may run when avoiding interfering with a fielder trying to field the ball?
3leftturns

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurosawa
The wrist bands are to fool-proof the process, it seems to me - both pitcher and catcher have the same wrist ban. Just ban calling pitches from the dugout. Gag Clint.

Nothing in the new rules, not even a clarification, on running out of the third-base path to elude a tag.
Well, THAT, as pathetic as it was, was a judgment call.

The rule, based on what was quoted on TV at least, was pretty clear that that should absolutely have been an out.

They DID put the running lane back, so there is an indication that that sort of garbage may be a point of emphasis

Pathetic how the lazy umpires didn't force kids to get into foul territory on the second half of their runs to first base on bunts
PDad

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CajunAmos
Some help please. With the re institution of a runners lane to first, is there a limit to how far outside the runners lane a runner may run when avoiding interfering with a fielder trying to field the ball?

Nothing specified, however going further than necessary delays them getting to first.

The exception for avoiding the player trying to field the ball is because they may still be outside the lane when the fielder tries to throw to first. So, my question is whether the exception holds after avoiding the fielder if she takes a direct route to first base - or does she need to make an attempt to get into the runners lane?
Kurosawa

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Reply with quote  #26 
The problem is primarily with slappers, who can end up well into the field of play. I wouldn't put it past some coaches to coach this as a deliberate tactic.
3leftturns

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Reply with quote  #27 
Easy to tell who is making no effort to get foul. Almost as easy as calling illegal pitches
Fresh

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Reply with quote  #28 
Catcher and pitcher only using the armbands would take more time. The coach has a card segregated by pitch type. Player cards only have resulting number and pitch. The card system allows not only the pitcher and catcher, but the entire infield to know pitch and location. Have you noticed the corners coming in and going back to their positions when taking signs from the catcher? The cards eliminate that. Cards do not take longer, indecisive coaches do.
PH2

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Reply with quote  #29 
I think we can all agree it's ridiculous to see armbands at the 10/12U level.  Instead, the coach should just yell, "Try to throw a fastball somewhere near the outside corner!"

That, and 3B coaches having to give a signal before every pitch.  My favorite is 2 outs, no one on, RH hitter up, 1st pitch.  "2-2-4!"  WTH does that kid need a signal for?  Hit a strike hard!
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