Ultimate College Softball
Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 5 of 7     «   Prev   2   3   4   5   6   7   Next
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #121 
The folks that lived here prior to us got a free apple tree at an arbor day give away at Lowe's.  I, nor they, have any idea what variety that is.

They never pruned it, so now it has about 5 trunks.  The main trunk/tree is about 30 feet tall, with the others at varying heights between about 12-20.

I aim to bring it all back down to about 15, but you're not supposed to trim more than 5-6 feet per year, so it will take some time.

It also has branches growing all criss-cross, rubbing on each other.  Too much shade inside the tree traps humidity and results in small apples.  That happened last year.  So I have to cut out much of that middle wood too, and try to leave about some main branches.  Across all 5 trunks, that will end up as 30-40 branches.

What I'm doing is trying to design it so that there are 4-6 branches of Honeycrisp, a few of the native (mystery apple),and then maybe 2 each of all of the other varieties.

So, one tree, with about 5 trunks and 30 branches, with 20 different types of apples, all getting ripe at different times.

So, the short answer is not yet to Honeycrisp.  I started two branches of those last year.  The grafts took, and they grew some, but not lots.  Part of that is too much tree, with growing diverted elsewhere, and part of it is that the grafts grow maybe 1-2 feet the first year, then 5-6 the next, then produce apples the third.  There may be a few apples this year, but not many.  Each variety is different.

I may remove all but one apple of last year's varieties, so the tree puts all its energy growing out the branches more, so we can actually have some real apples next year.

I also have to devise varmint protection to keep critters out of the tree.
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #122 
I'm also planting a peach/nectarine/plum grafted multi tree this year.  So, next year, we'll get all 3 of those from one tree also.

I have an ornamental cherry out front that I am thinking of grafting a few fruiting cherries onto.  Not sure yet if I want to do that though, because cherries don't grow too well here.  Not enough chill hours.

I also hope to try my hand at some homemade Maple syrup in about a month.  The wife is not too crazy about that project, fearing the inevitable kitchen disaster.  I would like to try it though, so I might have to send out to the store or something one day while I tap sap.

Blackberries look good, blueberries are OK, and all the raspberries died, so I'll have to replant some of those.
keepinitreal

Registered:
Posts: 27,243
Reply with quote  #123 
Personally if I could get Honeycrisp to take and produce prolifically I'd stop.  But I would be missing the best to preserve and the best for pies.

That one tree sounds like a mess but tree sculpturing sounds fun and my favorite part of tree growing is the pruning, 28 year Arbor Day member

__________________
"Getting your motor revved about taking our guns is going to be what undoes your efforts."

"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #124 
This tree will have more Honeycrisp than anything, because I like those best too.

I'm trying to do the heirloom thing too though, because some of these old varieties are very uncommon, and really only exist in heritage orchards anymore.

It's weird I know, but it's a sort of homage to the ancestors sort of thing - grow the stuff that they enjoyed 200 years ago, that you can't get anymore.  And, some of those apples are supposed to be really good also, so I guess we'll see.

If I can have fresh apples from June to November, I will be fulfilled.  OK, maybe not, but happy.

I may end up planting a Honeycrisp tree separately, depending upon what these grafts look like, just to make sure I have plenty of those.
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #125 
Quote:
Originally Posted by keepinitreal


That one tree sounds like a mess but tree sculpturing sounds fun and my favorite part of tree growing is the pruning, 28 year Arbor Day member


I've never done this before, so I'm hoping I don't kill it.

If I can bring it back to productivity, it will be worth the effort.
CoachB25

Registered:
Posts: 628
Reply with quote  #126 
Here is a FYI for all of you.  We are selling off the farm parcels at a time.  We have a parcel of about 5 acres along the interstate.  Our realtor put up a sign two years ago but the trees, ... have grown up and are blocking it.  Believe it or not, the state will not mow along that parcel but mows along every other parcel on both sides of the interstate.  This has been a major point of contention.  We needed that sign to be cleared so I show up with my chainsaw, trimmer, mower, ...  A state truck pulls up, stops and asked me what I was doing.  I explained.  This guy asked me to show my permission slip to trim this overgrowth that is a total mess.  I didn't have one.  He then said that a Monarch Butterfly was seen in those trees a few years ago and that this patch of trees, shrubs, thatch, mess, ... can not be cleaned up.  Had I started, I would have had a "major fine" to pay.  The wife and I are now applying for a permit to trim trees that the state let grow while mowing all other land around the interstate.  BTW, we can't trim the ones on our side of the fence.  
__________________
Those mountains in front of you will seem like little hills when you are beyond them and they are in the past!
keepinitreal

Registered:
Posts: 27,243
Reply with quote  #127 
I have Monarchs most of the year on my 3/4 acre.  That state dude needs to look up migration paths of the Monarch, what a bunch of dingbats.  I read a book back in my 20s that centered around on bird and butterfly habitat for your backyard, it worked
__________________
"Getting your motor revved about taking our guns is going to be what undoes your efforts."

"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #128 
Sounds fishy coach.  Sent you a PM.

NM, I did not send you a PM, because it said I didn't have permission to do so.

Check this link:

https://mdc.mo.gov/property/responsible-construction/missouri-natural-heritage-program

I can not imagine that Monarchs are protected.  I don't even think that milkweeds are.

I have an office in Missouri, if that's where you're at, and I can ask our guys there for help if you like.
woody

Registered:
Posts: 10,210
Reply with quote  #129 
If you want butterflies, plant Mexican Goat Weed (be careful where, it spreads big time, Butterfly plant (these can get big in diameter and about 4' tall), Red Pentas, and also Salvia (looks like a butterfly plant but stays smaller.) The Mexican goat weed will feed the caterpillars. They will eat the stalk bare. Don't trim them. While the caterpillars are building cocoons, they will grow back their leaves and a red and yellow flower bunch at the top and the process continues all summer long. Cut them back to ground level in late December.
__________________
Jane you ignorant slut. Keep your booger hook of the bang switch, you stupid Socialist. 

Beer me Hippie. I feel more like I do now, than when I first got here.
CoachB25

Registered:
Posts: 628
Reply with quote  #130 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikec
Sounds fishy coach.  Sent you a PM.

NM, I did not send you a PM, because it said I didn't have permission to do so.

Check this link:

https://mdc.mo.gov/property/responsible-construction/missouri-natural-heritage-program

I can not imagine that Monarchs are protected.  I don't even think that milkweeds are.

I have an office in Missouri, if that's where you're at, and I can ask our guys there for help if you like.


Mike, I don't know about the pm status.  I never get them but didn't block anyone.  I am not worried about clearing that land.  I'm going to do it anyway.  I do have to find a better time to do so.  My guess is that when it is cleared, no one will notice anyway.

Edited to add:

Mike, I live across the river from St. Louis and in Illinois.  20 miles east to be specific.  

__________________
Those mountains in front of you will seem like little hills when you are beyond them and they are in the past!
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #131 
A couple of quick searches at the Illinois DNR site tells me they are probably after the plants, as opposed to the butterflies.  The butterflies are an indicator, meaning they tend to use the plant that is protected.

You may want to try to figure out what the plant type is, as you could get in trouble if it's protected and you cut it.
keepinitreal

Registered:
Posts: 27,243
Reply with quote  #132 
Cut it in the dead of night with your neighbors
__________________
"Getting your motor revved about taking our guns is going to be what undoes your efforts."

"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
uwApoligist

Registered:
Posts: 10,749
Reply with quote  #133 
In WA state they have quite an apple heritage.  Right now there are a bunch of new brands.   This is along the lines of craft brewing, craft distilling.  These brands are willing to break a lot of the rules.  

10 years ago the Fuji was all the rage.  It is a great looking fruit, that is pretty good in flavor.  Great looking fruits that market themselves in the grocery store.  The Fuji being a GMO'd apple designed not to turn brown.

Many of these new brands have abandoned their apple is pretty approach.  They are just going for texture (crisp) and flavor.  They are also mostly non-GMO, compared to the Fuji.  They actually like varieties that turn brown.  They are looking for apples with even freckling and a bit of brown around the stem.  They state that the apple is telling you that the sugars inside are reaching their peak.

For instance the Opal is a great tasting ugly as sin apple.  http://www.opalapples.com/  All the images must be touched up to remove the brown spots as everyone I have seen has quite a bit of brown freckling.  

I am sure there has been a long history of looks vs shelf life vs flavor in the apple growing industry that goes back to those heritage varieties.

Any, kind of trendy thing happening in the WA state area, I thought I would share.   

__________________
Originally Posted by Fresh
"before the election a d Iowa sId hi.self that there was nothing to it"
WTF?
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #134 
Washington grows all the apples for the country.  GA has a good orchard area near a town called Ellijay.  I go up there in season to buy apples, because fresh is best.

Anyways, given the level of industrialized apple growing in WA, it's not surprising that there would be that sort of movement you're talking about.

These heritage varieties mostly have imperfect shapes, don't store too long, or have irregular coloring.  That's why they aren't grown commercially any longer.

To me, a few branches of each type means I don't have to store them too long, because I'll eat them before the next type starts to ripen.

The Godfather of old southern heirloom varieties, Lee Calhoun, wrote an excellent book describing them all, and many are just what you said - irregular, but very tasty.

Back to the future for me.
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #135 
I guess I am just too simple of a person.

I was just out back watching some bees pollinate my peach trees.  As I was watching, I was thinking how precise and intricate of a system it is to produce fruit.  It is delicate, and involved, and very interesting to watch.

The bigger thing that hit me is this:  I believe this is God's design, and we can choose to see it every day in the simplest of things, if we want to. 

So, stop once in awhile, and enjoy the simples of things, and remember that it's not all by accident.
bluedog

Registered:
Posts: 10,642
Reply with quote  #136 
The Creator's plan is perfect.............So perfect that He pulled the Garden Of Eden off the earth before mankind harmed it.............His followers will get to see it some day...........
BillSmith

Registered:
Posts: 6,753
Reply with quote  #137 
I'm reading Mike's post and have had an epiphany. Such poignant prose struck me as to a possible explanation for the South's fascination with Christianity.

Could it be simply a Redneck's subconscious attempt at confronting the contradiction in their perception of life? Deep-rooted sensitivity manifests into a belief in God and his garden when really they are just GAF.

Just a hypothesis. Will research a wee bit more. Promise to share my findings.

__________________
Sometimes you are the mole, sometimes the mushroom.
keepinitreal

Registered:
Posts: 27,243
Reply with quote  #138 
My turnips and collards been in the ground a whole month, will produce by April.  Sunflowers planted for the birds and the wife, just sprouted.  Put some nice tomato plants in Feb 28, moon was on the rise. 

That's my small garden, don't have my 1/4 acre in yet

__________________
"Getting your motor revved about taking our guns is going to be what undoes your efforts."

"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
bluedog

Registered:
Posts: 10,642
Reply with quote  #139 
Real, how does your wife cook the sunflowers?
bluedog

Registered:
Posts: 10,642
Reply with quote  #140 
Quote:
I'm reading Mike's post and have had an epiphany. 


Sure it wasn't an enema, instead?.........Please don't share those findings with us..........
spazsdad

Registered:
Posts: 6,312
Reply with quote  #141 
This from the guy with diarrhea of the keyboard.
He may be BS but he is not full of it like you

__________________
#SCOTUS

keepinitreal

Registered:
Posts: 27,243
Reply with quote  #142 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog
Real, how does your wife cook the sunflowers?


very slowly

__________________
"Getting your motor revved about taking our guns is going to be what undoes your efforts."

"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
Lost_1

Registered:
Posts: 3,138
Reply with quote  #143 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillSmith
I'm reading Mike's post and have had an epiphany. Such poignant prose struck me as to a possible explanation for the South's fascination with Christianity.

Could it be simply a Redneck's subconscious attempt at confronting the contradiction in their perception of life? Deep-rooted sensitivity manifests into a belief in God and his garden when really they are just GAF.

Just a hypothesis. Will research a wee bit more. Promise to share my findings.






And maybe it is much simpler:



Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost_1
You seem to be a bit wound tight this morning. Come on out to Gods county, and we can fix that attitude. I was out well before daybreak, and watched nature wake up to a new day. Saw a coyote get out foxed by a smart old squirrel, and a couple deer sneaking into my hay. Cows are counted and fed, horses turned out and now it's time for breakfast. Nothing more relaxing then starting the day in the great outdoors watching Gods creatures.

__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


bluedog

Registered:
Posts: 10,642
Reply with quote  #144 
Spazzy, it would take more than just an enema to clean you up................
spazsdad

Registered:
Posts: 6,312
Reply with quote  #145 
Just had my colonoscopy I’m all clear thanks for asking.
So blow me
How’s that
Your holier than though shtick is repulsive. Strange bible you study

__________________
#SCOTUS

bluedog

Registered:
Posts: 10,642
Reply with quote  #146 
Spaz, your hatred is harmful to your soul...........You can change and turn your life around..........But, you gotta wanna do it............And, you gotta read...........And study...........
uwApoligist

Registered:
Posts: 10,749
Reply with quote  #147 
Quote:
Originally Posted by keepinitreal


very slowly

as slow as freshy thinks?  Slow like that?

__________________
Originally Posted by Fresh
"before the election a d Iowa sId hi.self that there was nothing to it"
WTF?
bluedog

Registered:
Posts: 10,642
Reply with quote  #148 
Nothing is that slow.........Even a broken clock is faster than the mind of a liberal..........
keepinitreal

Registered:
Posts: 27,243
Reply with quote  #149 
Quote:
Originally Posted by uwApoligist

as slow as freshy thinks?  Slow like that?


Yes, set the oven at 125 degrees to dry, like his soul

__________________
"Getting your motor revved about taking our guns is going to be what undoes your efforts."

"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
mikec

Registered:
Posts: 9,005
Reply with quote  #150 
Alternatively, it could be that we believe in God, and every now and again, are struck by the simplicity, yet complexity, and beauty of God's plan.

Pretty sure, though I guess you can never be 100%, that GAF doesn't really apply in this case.

Strike that - 100%.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BillSmith
I'm reading Mike's post and have had an epiphany. Such poignant prose struck me as to a possible explanation for the South's fascination with Christianity.

Could it be simply a Redneck's subconscious attempt at confronting the contradiction in their perception of life? Deep-rooted sensitivity manifests into a belief in God and his garden when really they are just GAF.

Just a hypothesis. Will research a wee bit more. Promise to share my findings.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.