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woody

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Reply with quote  #91 
All the ranchers around here have donkeys with their cattle. They run the show. I new a horse trainer that kept a couple. If he had a young stud horse that thought he was too bad ass to be broke, and a misbehaving knot head fool, he would put the stud in a round pen with a couple of donkeys. The horse soon figured out that being a big stud wasn't a match for a couple of mean little donkeys kicking and biting your belly while double teaming you..
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You Liberals crying for open borders for the most part, don't live on the border. You are therefore insulated from illegal immigration. You are immune from the local costs involved, both economic, and in lives lost. So unless you live down here, and bear the burden, STFU about "immigration reform". You know nothing, and are better suited to eating bandwidth and scones at a Starbucks than telling me what I should feel. Arrogant Pissants.

"IT'S GOOD TO BE DA KING"
mikec

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Reply with quote  #92 
I'd love to have pecan trees, but those take forever to produce, and get too big for my small plot of land.  One of my favorite nuts.

It is funny, though.  I saw pecan tree for sale at Home Depot.  They were about 1" caliper, and 5 feet tall.  I was picturing people taking those home, s excited about having a pecan tree, and then waiting 10 years for it do anything.

With the price of pecans of late, that would be a good bumper crop to have.
uwApoligist

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Reply with quote  #93 
Quote:
Originally Posted by woody
All the ranchers around here have donkeys with their cattle. They run the show. I new a horse trainer that kept a couple. If he had a young stud horse that thought he was too bad ass to be broke, and a misbehaving knot head fool, he would put the stud in a round pen with a couple of donkeys. The horse soon figured out that being a big stud wasn't a match for a couple of mean little donkeys kicking and biting your belly while double teaming you..

We have seen reintroduction of the wolve across large parts of the US.  Deer were overrunning many many states.  WI, IL, OH, MI, all the way out west.   Those reintroduced wolves now have large spread out packs, and they are multiplying like crazy.

So now farmers and ranchers everywhere are rediscovery that mixing in donkeys with your cattle can greatly up the price for wolves to find cattle as an easy meal.  

You should also see soon, as the wolf populations continue to grow, the reintroduction of wolf hounds to guard cattle. 

Around rural Washington state they are already hunting wolves.  The numbers are small, but definitely allowing hunting.

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"I’m going to plead with you, do not cross us. Because if you do, the survivors will write about what we do here for 10,000 years." - Mattis
woody

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Reply with quote  #94 
The Federal and state governments used to employee trappers to catch wolves and coyotes preying on cattle. Gillespie county in Texas was paying for coyote tails up to about 5 years ago. Now the Feds are paying to reintroduce wolves. I met an old trapper that worked for local ranchers. He was old school. Had a couple of big dogs he used to kill coyotes. He had one that looked like a Pitt bull that he would send into culverts to kill coyotes in their dens. I saw my first wolf in about 35 years a couple of years ago. Texas Parks and Wildlife says there are none remaining in our area. I saw one and told a nearby rancher. He said I saw him too, and started saying I told you so to his wife,
__________________
You Liberals crying for open borders for the most part, don't live on the border. You are therefore insulated from illegal immigration. You are immune from the local costs involved, both economic, and in lives lost. So unless you live down here, and bear the burden, STFU about "immigration reform". You know nothing, and are better suited to eating bandwidth and scones at a Starbucks than telling me what I should feel. Arrogant Pissants.

"IT'S GOOD TO BE DA KING"
uwApoligist

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Reply with quote  #95 
Around here we have really big coyote packs.   They move from neighborhood to neighborhood eating all the liberals cats.  

For some reasons liberals like to have cats that are declawed, but since the cat "really wants to go outside" they let them hang outside.  I have told them coyotes going to get that no claw goofball running around on the ground like that.  Sure enough coyotes move, fluffy, mittens ... all gone.  Coyotes move on.

Then standing out talking to neighbors.  They start hassling my conservative friend about his outdoor mean a55 cat that has claws being mean to their fluffies.  We still chuckle about how they have zero clue what played out.  

Republican cat was the only one to survive the onslaught.   As the cat herd thinned those coyotes started targeting him a bit, until he laid into them.  you would hear him at night, just getting after em. 

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"I’m going to plead with you, do not cross us. Because if you do, the survivors will write about what we do here for 10,000 years." - Mattis
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #96 
Sounds like what the French are going through right now after they have disarmed themselves and the Islamic terrorists move in like coyotes on fluffies
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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
mikec

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Reply with quote  #97 
Maybe Woody's Armory can take care of the coyotes, here and in France.
woody

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Reply with quote  #98 
I have had lots of cats. Usually no more than 3-4 at a time. A few are good barn cats and live long lives. I have had a few that have gotten torn up by coyotes. Had one that I had to cut her tail off after she came in mauled up. She lasted another two years then disappeared. I always get any females fixed, the toms usually make it around 5 years if they are smart. Cats are not allowed in the house, unless they are the old mama cat and is 20 degrees outside. Then they are allowed a brief stay on a blanket out of the cold during the day.

Speaking of the armory, I picked up a bull barreled .22 savage with a threaded barrel yesterday. I watched my gunsmith working on a custom barrel for a ruger model 1. Is was a 25-06 caliber, 24" bull barrel. It was unique in that it had not just a fluted stainless barrel, but the fluting was spiraled with the rate of twist, instead of running straight down the length of the barrel. He was drilling and tapping it for scope mounts. Precision work at its finest. This is an old country boy that is a master gunsmith with his own lathes, drill presses and oven for teflon coating processes.

__________________
You Liberals crying for open borders for the most part, don't live on the border. You are therefore insulated from illegal immigration. You are immune from the local costs involved, both economic, and in lives lost. So unless you live down here, and bear the burden, STFU about "immigration reform". You know nothing, and are better suited to eating bandwidth and scones at a Starbucks than telling me what I should feel. Arrogant Pissants.

"IT'S GOOD TO BE DA KING"
mikec

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Reply with quote  #99 
Well, of 12 apple grafts, so far the score is:
2 dead
3 sprouting leaves (2 Winesap, 1 Honeycrisp)
7 TBD

Really hoping to bat at least .500 on these, and have 4 varieties for now.  If that happens, I'll graft a little more aggressively next spring, with maybe another 4 or 5 varieties.  If I do it right, I could have apples from July to Nov. 

Apples are one of the things I eat the most of, so I would love to have an endless supply.

My finger slice isn't even done healing yet  - would like to see the apples be nice to me since I almost bled to death trying to give them life.
mikec

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Reply with quote  #100 
update to add two more Honeycrisp, and a Tarbutton graft now sprouting leaves.

If I'm lucky, I might have have Winesaps, Tarbuttons, and Honeycrisps next year.   I think I'll have to add some more next Spring.

Those to go with the mystery apple that is the native tree.  I suppose I'll figure that out once I see them.  I think it may be something that is actually the original rootstock, but no one knows what it is.  I'll sleuth it out once I get one in my hand.  Neighbor says they're good eating though.

Project frankentree moving ahead.
woody

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Reply with quote  #101 
It's your blood right after all.[biggrin]

On a sad note, I am battling borers on a few oak trees. Burn pile may be the only option.

__________________
You Liberals crying for open borders for the most part, don't live on the border. You are therefore insulated from illegal immigration. You are immune from the local costs involved, both economic, and in lives lost. So unless you live down here, and bear the burden, STFU about "immigration reform". You know nothing, and are better suited to eating bandwidth and scones at a Starbucks than telling me what I should feel. Arrogant Pissants.

"IT'S GOOD TO BE DA KING"
mikec

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Reply with quote  #102 
I've just read up on making maple syrup.  Next spring, I'm going to tap a couple of the huge maples and give it a try.  The wife thinks I'm nuts, and isn't a big fan.  She seems to have this idea that I'll end up making a huge sticky mess of her kitchen.

What could go wrong?
spazsdad

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Reply with quote  #103 
Your wife sounds like a wise woman aside from the choice of partners.😝
mikec

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Reply with quote  #104 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spazsdad
Your wife sounds like a wise woman aside from the choice of partners.😝


She is on both accounts.

As I tell folks, the priest at our wedding thought I was in some sort of hyper-shock because I was so calm. 

I kept telling him to get on with it before she changed her mind.

When she walked in the back of the church to proceed up the aisle, I turned to look at him, and he winked.  Afterwards, he said he understood my concerns when she walked in. 
uwApoligist

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Reply with quote  #105 
Grafted roses for my mother many many years ago.  My uncle had a 10 acre apple orchard and was great at grafting, so I watched him a number of times.

I would say the most important part is limit air contact to the absolute bare minimum.  My uncle would take a bucket of water and put a few paper towels in the water.  As soon as the graft cut was made he would cover with a wet paper towel.  That gave him time to unwrap the new graft, clean cut that, and then mate the two.

Not sure if you are wrapping your grafts.  You definitely should be.  He used bailing twine and masking tape (the paper kind).  I suspect there are better things to wrap with nowadays.

Looking around the internet I found this article gave some good hints (from what I remember). 

http://www.paulbardenroses.com/graftingtips.html

It says you have to work quickly, but I think the real key is to limit exposure of any cuts to the air.  As soon as those wood cells sense air they start moving sap to the wound to seal it up.



__________________
"I’m going to plead with you, do not cross us. Because if you do, the survivors will write about what we do here for 10,000 years." - Mattis
mikec

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Reply with quote  #106 
Since I sliced my finger on the very first one, I probably went a little slower than ideal.  5 have broken dormancy, and I think 3 more will soon.  If I go 8 for 12 I will be thrilled.

Next spring, I will experiment with some different grafts, and add more varieties.

To bind them, I used parafilm grafting tape, but you can use masking tape or twine.  The parafilm biodegrades in about 3 months, so it's nice to use.

Your uncle's 10 acre orchard is my aspiration.  I want to have something like that, and have some of the tried and true varieties like Granny Smith and Honeycrisp, but a whole lot of antique old south varieties that you can't buy anywhere else.  That was the idea behind Tarbutton (a pre Civil War Georgia apple that was popular way back) and the Virginia Winesap.

Next spring I'll adds some other old varieties.  At some point, I need to look for land, but the wife wants to get out of debt and get an RV.  I need to make her watch Gone with the Wind again.

"What is there to do? What is there that matters? Tara!"

[4a53e3f73da3add43aea2de001c0a954] 
mikec

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Reply with quote  #107 
Fantastic.  1.5 million of these things per acre?  If I have 2 million of these on my property, I am not sure I'll make it.  We are right in the middle of the area they list.  Just beautiful.

**********************

Georgians with a keen sense of sound and a watchful eye for insects are in for a surprise as swarms of cicadas and their overpowering hums make their way to Georgia any day now.

These insects, also called “17-year locusts,” are notorious for disappearing for several years (in this case, 17) and reappearing  “at force” in intervals, according to National Geographic

The 17-year brood, Brood VI, is estimated to hatch this month in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, according to the Gardener’s Network.

This brood probably won’t be back until 2034, but Brood X is estimated to make its way to Georgia in 2021.

The insects are expected to emerge in Rabun County and later show up in Dade, Elbert, Floyd, Habersham, Paulding, White and other surrounding counties.

“The Georgia brood could number in the millions and may impact anywhere from a single, small area to several states,” Patch reported.

 

University of Georgia entomologist Nancy C. Hinkle said Georgians may first notice shed cicada skins on trees and poles and later, notice the red-eyed insects flying around trees and bushes.

According to Hinkle, the bugs aren’t particularly harmful to animals and plants, but could occasionally pierce plant stems.

However, massive swarms of the insects crowded in a single area could potentially damage young trees.

The undigested remnants of the cicadas could also be harmful to dogs and are known to upset their stomachs, according to the New York Times.

In 2016, some areas saw densities of 1.5 million periodical cicadas per acre,  the Washington Post reported.

“They’ll be out as one of the natural wonders of nature. Watch them, enjoy them and they’ll be gone in about a month,” John Cooley from the University of Connecticut ecology and evolutionary biology department said. 

After the periodical cicadas have tapered off, Cooley said, the summer cicadas will be on their way.

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