Ultimate College Softball
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 3      Prev   1   2   3   Next
Nextyear

Registered:
Posts: 268
Reply with quote  #31 
I can’t say I know Walton well other than to say I have met him a few times. I know of him from people who’s kids he recruited. To me he always seemed pretty straight forward and honest. I just don’t get this last few months.

He is one of the most high profile coaches in a sport that has been screaming from the rooftops that this early recruiting madness is hurting the game and is unhealthy for kids. Now he commits 4 middle schoolers including an 11 year old since the Fall. SMH
TideKid

Registered:
Posts: 2,012
Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3leftturns
I asked this earlier... what "other coaches" are "doing this"? Who else has a '24 and 2 '23s?


as reported in the article, had unofficials to both ucla and oklahoma. if she picked them of them could have won that race.

will tim be at florida in 7 years?
does she get grandfathered in before the ncaa tules change? is this the reason for the push?

top tier programs need a gentleman/woman’s agreement to not go after these kids. i guess the ncaa will provide that. really hurts the other programs.

early verbals absolutely killed me while trying to recruit to a d3 school. amazing my teams won given the talent pool left after everyone had been “spoken for” for years.

now, years is morphing into almost a decade.

__________________
***************
we LOVE free bases
NatRx

Registered:
Posts: 76
Reply with quote  #33 

https://ondecksoftball.net/blog/believe-me-it-means-nothing
NatRx

Registered:
Posts: 76
Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog


Parents who wanna brag...........


Just a thought, but I dunno that it’s just that selfish. Hear me out...

Most parents just want what’s best for our kids. I think this nonsense has gotten out of control for sure, but I think that as parents, it all starts with the same feeling/emotion/desire/need to take care of setting our kids’ up, as what gets us started on their college funds when they’re still babies. We have dreams and aspirations for them, so we start early. We’re constantly motivated to do all these things that “research shows” you gotta do with them when they’re young, so they can be the young Einstein’s of the world. As they grow older, and they start to show an inclination and interest towards the sport, we do everything we can to help them. We buy them $300 bats. $300 gloves. We start traveling. Then we hear about college camps, and kids are being looked at in 6th grade. We don’t want our kid left out, so we start going to those....
We somehow get caught up on this whirlwind of a ride the second we step in to this world. We don’t set out for it per se, we get swept into it. And once the ride takes off, it feels like there’s no turning back. If the coaches are gonna look/offer, the kids/parents are gonna accept. We just want to take care of our kids. I’m not saying it’s right. I’m saying we’re afraid that if we don’t do it, that we feel like we could be missing out on a golden opportunity for them.

Again, just a thought. But I do agree. This madness needs to be reigned in.
PH2

Registered:
Posts: 622
Reply with quote  #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatRx
https://ondecksoftball.net/blog/believe-me-it-means-nothing

I find it interesting/funny how those who have benefited from the early commit circus are now trying to backtrack somewhat on the system that they use to their financial advantage.  I guess they're reading the tea leaves and not wanting to be too far out there when things change.  Sure, verbals don't mean anything, but that's a fine line they are walking considering they tout their jamborees and athletic testing to the same age groups everyone is shaking their heads about committing too early.  If verbals don't matter and coaches shouldn't be taking such an interest in pre-HS kids, then why does a girl's pop time and home-to-first time need to be officially recorded at 12 or 13?
NadiaM

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #36 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatRx


Just a thought, but I dunno that it’s just that selfish. Hear me out...

Most parents just want what’s best for our kids. I think this nonsense has gotten out of control for sure, but I think that as parents, it all starts with the same feeling/emotion/desire/need to take care of setting our kids’ up, as what gets us started on their college funds when they’re still babies. We have dreams and aspirations for them, so we start early. We’re constantly motivated to do all these things that “research shows” you gotta do with them when they’re young, so they can be the young Einstein’s of the world. As they grow older, and they start to show an inclination and interest towards the sport, we do everything we can to help them. We buy them $300 bats. $300 gloves. We start traveling. Then we hear about college camps, and kids are being looked at in 6th grade. We don’t want our kid left out, so we start going to those....
We somehow get caught up on this whirlwind of a ride the second we step in to this world. We don’t set out for it per se, we get swept into it. And once the ride takes off, it feels like there’s no turning back. If the coaches are gonna look/offer, the kids/parents are gonna accept. We just want to take care of our kids. I’m not saying it’s right. I’m saying we’re afraid that if we don’t do it, that we feel like we could be missing out on a golden opportunity for them.

Again, just a thought. But I do agree. This madness needs to be reigned in.


I think you are correct. It’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind the first time around, and even the second time, or any time for that matter. However, even in all the excitement, the fact still remains that kids don’t know what they want to study, if grades will pan out, or if the kid will have the desire and emotional stability to handle being away from home. There are a myriad of other factors I can list that a parent knows the child doesn’t yet have answers to. That’s where we as parents come in; we have to slow it down.

Ten and a half years ago a top D1 made my 8th grade kid her first offer. It was my first time around. By the fall of her freshman year of high school, communicating with coaches was a daily thing. It was crazy. I thought this was the process, but I knew my kid was not yet ready to decide and I was overwhelmed. I was afraid to tell our head coach that we didn’t want to talk to coaches anymore out of fear my kid would miss out, but I did it anyway. We told our coach that she wasn’t ready to talk to coaches and that she wanted to get through her first year of high school before she started looking at colleges.

To my surprise, the news was overwhelmingly well received and everyone respected the boundaries. By the summer after her freshman year she was excited to talk to coaches and take visits. The difference that year made was tremendous. All this to say, that when we resumed communication with coaches, every single coach told me they appreciated the fact we slowed the recruiting process down. That’s why I think it’s the parents job to slow it down or halt it altogether when it gets out of control.

Let’s face it, while verbals are not binding, it is a business. Of course the coaches are going to do what they think will make them most competitive. Talk to any coach and they will tell you they think the early recruiting process is out of control. Yet, they still commit kids just out of elementary school to keep or stay ahead. If the parent or the NCAA doesn’t stop it, this will never stop.

The reality is that only a small number of kids get recruited that early when compared the number of kids that will go on to play in college in their respective classes. As our travel ball coach told me when I told them to tell coaches my kid wasn’t ready, if your kid is good enough to be recruited at 11,12, or 13, the coaches will wait for her.

And on that note, since Coach Walton is the one who committed the 11 year old, I offer this up.... he recruited both of my girls. My youngest is a freshman there now. UF was her first unofficial her freshman year of high school. We told him so, and we also told him we wanted the opportunity to talk to and visit other schools. He encouraged us to do it, and he told us we could take it as slow as we wanted to and that he understood.

The issue is that sometimes as parents we forget to parent the person, and we only parent the (potential) athlete.
NatRx

Registered:
Posts: 76
Reply with quote  #37 
Totally agree with what you’re saying. Parents need to take a deep breath, and actively slow things down. Great points!
bluedog

Registered:
Posts: 11,067
Reply with quote  #38 
I work with individual players whose parents claim their kid wants a D-1 college scholarship to play in college...........I turn-down more requests - some from parents with eight-year old kids -  than I accept.........And, every year the ages of those kids get younger and younger.........The truth is, pre-high school age kids only wanna please their parents..........They don't look past that...........They're still apprehensive about what high school is gonna be like..........

Braggadocious parents are sending their young kids all Summer and Fall to tournaments, college camps and showcases all over the country in hope a college coach somewhere will show 'em some interest at ages they should be preparing themselves for high school..........

Travel-ball teams at pre-high school ages traveling all across the country all Summer and Fall are the result of parents who fund them..........They couldn't exist without the funding.........
3leftturns

Registered:
Posts: 16,102
Reply with quote  #39 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
I think you are correct. It’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind the first time around, and even the second time, or any time for that matter. However, even in all the excitement, the fact still remains that kids don’t know what they want to study, if grades will pan out, or if the kid will have the desire and emotional stability to handle being away from home. There are a myriad of other factors I can list that a parent knows the child doesn’t yet have answers to. That’s where we as parents come in; we have to slow it down. Ten and a half years ago a top D1 made my 8th grade kid her first offer. It was my first time around. By the fall of her freshman year of high school, communicating with coaches was a daily thing. It was crazy. I thought this was the process, but I knew my kid was not yet ready to decide and I was overwhelmed. I was afraid to tell our head coach that we didn’t want to talk to coaches anymore out of fear my kid would miss out, but I did it anyway. We told our coach that she wasn’t ready to talk to coaches and that she wanted to get through her first year of high school before she started looking at colleges. To my surprise, the news was overwhelmingly well received and everyone respected the boundaries. By the summer after her freshman year she was excited to talk to coaches and take visits. The difference that year made was tremendous. All this to say, that when we resumed communication with coaches, every single coach told me they appreciated the fact we slowed the recruiting process down. That’s why I think it’s the parents job to slow it down or halt it altogether when it gets out of control. Let’s face it, while verbals are not binding, it is a business. Of course the coaches are going to do what they think will make them most competitive. Talk to any coach and they will tell you they think the early recruiting process is out of control. Yet, they still commit kids just out of elementary school to keep or stay ahead. If the parent or the NCAA doesn’t stop it, this will never stop. The reality is that only a small number of kids get recruited that early when compared the number of kids that will go on to play in college in their respective classes. As our travel ball coach told me when I told them to tell coaches my kid wasn’t ready, if your kid is good enough to be recruited at 11,12, or 13, the coaches will wait for her. And on that note, since Coach Walton is the one who committed the 11 year old, I offer this up.... he recruited both of my girls. My youngest is a freshman there now. UF was her first unofficial her freshman year of high school. We told him so, and we also told him we wanted the opportunity to talk to and visit other schools. He encouraged us to do it, and he told us we could take it as slow as we wanted to and that he understood. The issue is that sometimes as parents we forget to parent the person, and we only parent the (potential) athlete.
Great take, NadiaM

Though I may offer a little bit of push on "if your kid is good enough to be recruited at 11,12, or 13, the coaches will wait for her."

If the kid stops growing, stagnates, falls hard for a distracting boyfriend, the coaches will hop off.

But that is the same deal, whether the young'n has an oral agreement in the back pocket or not


Thanks so much for sharing your experience

NadiaM

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #40 
I understand what you’re saying about kids who stagnate, but from what I have seen in travel ball since 2004, that doesn’t apply to the handful of kids who are the elite of the elite. So, yes, I agree that a lot of kids fall by the wayside. However, I contend the kids that don’t pan out have tell-tale signs that predict that outcome. The kids who dominate early on because they are bigger and more physical mature or just smarter at playing the game than their peers don’t have all the same attributes as the elite of the elite. That’s why coaches can make these types of commitments relatively sure of what they will get years down the road.

In other words, the elite of the elite are the complete package even at a young age without physical maturity being a factor. They tend to be stronger, more athletic, more efficient in their movements, lighter on their feet, quicker reflexes, faters and just “get it” easier than their peers. The kids highly recruited at that age already have ability to perform well above their age. So even if they only improve marginally, they tend to be average D1 players at worst. It is usually a pretty safe bet, barring injury.
Kurosawa

Registered:
Posts: 3,186
Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
I agree 11 years old is way too young to commit, but I wonder why any parent would deem a kid capable of making such decision. It’s not all on the coaches. In fact, I think we as parents bear the entire responsibility of overseeing and directing the recruitment process. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard parents say their kids called (insert head coach’s name here), and feel so awkward about the conversation their kid had, which only left them with more questions. To which my question is always the same, why didn’t you call.? And, the answer is always the same- our travel coach said they don’t want to talk to the parents. My personal view on the matter, speaking from experience as a parent whose kids were recruited in Jr. High and committed early in HS, is that if a coach didn’t want to talk to me, my kid wasn’t going to talk to that coach. Every single first contact we made by phone with a university began with a phone call placed by me. And that includes Walton and the like. Coaches wouldn’t commit young players if parents said, not yet. Been in travel ball in since 2004 and I believe only parents and the NCAA can stop this veritable run away train. Just my two cents.


So, if a stranger is plying your child with candy, it's not their fault, but yours for not "overseeing and directing" the candy-exchange process?
Kurosawa

Registered:
Posts: 3,186
Reply with quote  #42 
Some of this could be a rush to secure future commits before the NCAA, as is rumored, slams the door shut on early contacts, with the expectation, perhaps unjustified, that continuing contacts with previously committed young recruits will be "grandfathered" in. If they don't improve or mature, they'll simply be dumped.
NadiaM

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #43 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurosawa


So, if a stranger is plying your child with candy, it's not their fault, but yours for not "overseeing and directing" the candy-exchange process?


I don’t think I understand your question. Are you saying coaches offering scholarships to kids equates to plying a kid with malicious intent? I honestly don’t understand what you mean.
HenryLouisAaron

Registered:
Posts: 1,999
Reply with quote  #44 
<< I think you are correct. It’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind the first time around, and even the second time, or any time for that matter. However, even in all the excitement, the fact still remains that kids don’t know what they want to study, if grades will pan out, or if the kid will have the desire and emotional stability to handle being away from home. There are a myriad of other factors I can list that a parent knows the child doesn’t yet have answers to. That’s where we as parents come in; we have to slow it down. 

Ten and a half years ago a top D1 made my 8th grade kid her first offer. It was my first time around. By the fall of her freshman year of high school, communicating with coaches was a daily thing. It was crazy. I thought this was the process, but I knew my kid was not yet ready to decide and I was overwhelmed. I was afraid to tell our head coach that we didn’t want to talk to coaches anymore out of fear my kid would miss out, but I did it anyway. We told our coach that she wasn’t ready to talk to coaches and that she wanted to get through her first year of high school before she started looking at colleges. 

To my surprise, the news was overwhelmingly well received and everyone respected the boundaries. By the summer after her freshman year she was excited to talk to coaches and take visits. The difference that year made was tremendous. All this to say, that when we resumed communication with coaches, every single coach told me they appreciated the fact we slowed the recruiting process down. That’s why I think it’s the parents job to slow it down or halt it altogether when it gets out of control. 

Let’s face it, while verbals are not binding, it is a business. Of course the coaches are going to do what they think will make them most competitive. Talk to any coach and they will tell you they think the early recruiting process is out of control. Yet, they still commit kids just out of elementary school to keep or stay ahead. If the parent or the NCAA doesn’t stop it, this will never stop. 

The reality is that only a small number of kids get recruited that early when compared the number of kids that will go on to play in college in their respective classes. As our travel ball coach told me when I told them to tell coaches my kid wasn’t ready, if your kid is good enough to be recruited at 11,12, or 13, the coaches will wait for her. 

And on that note, since Coach Walton is the one who committed the 11 year old, I offer this up.... he recruited both of my girls. My youngest is a freshman there now. UF was her first unofficial her freshman year of high school. We told him so, and we also told him we wanted the opportunity to talk to and visit other schools. He encouraged us to do it, and he told us we could take it as slow as we wanted to and that he understood. >> (NadiaM)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Thanks for sharing your experience with us, NadiaM. 
I particularly liked the segment that I put in bold. I believe that is quite true for the most part. 

I have to add this... 
I am most impressed that you have been registered since 2009 - and have made just 7 posts.
This makes me want to see just exactly what those other six posts were about.
HenryLouisAaron

Registered:
Posts: 1,999
Reply with quote  #45 
<< I understand what you’re saying about kids who stagnate, but from what I have seen in travel ball since 2004, that doesn’t apply to the handful of kids who are the elite of the elite. So, yes, I agree that a lot of kids fall by the wayside. However, I contend the kids that don’t pan out have tell-tale signs that predict that outcome. The kids who dominate early on because they are bigger and more physical mature or just smarter at playing the game than their peers don’t have all the same attributes as the elite of the elite. That’s why coaches can make these types of commitments relatively sure of what they will get years down the road. 

In other words, the elite of the elite are the complete package even at a young age without physical maturity being a factor. They tend to be stronger, more athletic, more efficient in their movements, lighter on their feet, quicker reflexes, faters and just “get it” easier than their peers. The kids highly recruited at that age already have ability to perform well above their age. So even if they only improve marginally, they tend to be average D1 players at worst. It is usually a pretty safe bet, barring injury. >> (NadiaM)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I agree with your point above - as well. The best of the best stand out and can be identified relatively easily - for the most part. There will always be some exceptions.
NadiaM

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #46 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HenryLouisAaron
<< I think you are correct. It’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind the first time around, and even the second time, or any time for that matter. However, even in all the excitement, the fact still remains that kids don’t know what they want to study, if grades will pan out, or if the kid will have the desire and emotional stability to handle being away from home. There are a myriad of other factors I can list that a parent knows the child doesn’t yet have answers to. That’s where we as parents come in; we have to slow it down. 

Ten and a half years ago a top D1 made my 8th grade kid her first offer. It was my first time around. By the fall of her freshman year of high school, communicating with coaches was a daily thing. It was crazy. I thought this was the process, but I knew my kid was not yet ready to decide and I was overwhelmed. I was afraid to tell our head coach that we didn’t want to talk to coaches anymore out of fear my kid would miss out, but I did it anyway. We told our coach that she wasn’t ready to talk to coaches and that she wanted to get through her first year of high school before she started looking at colleges. 

To my surprise, the news was overwhelmingly well received and everyone respected the boundaries. By the summer after her freshman year she was excited to talk to coaches and take visits. The difference that year made was tremendous. All this to say, that when we resumed communication with coaches, every single coach told me they appreciated the fact we slowed the recruiting process down. That’s why I think it’s the parents job to slow it down or halt it altogether when it gets out of control. 

Let’s face it, while verbals are not binding, it is a business. Of course the coaches are going to do what they think will make them most competitive. Talk to any coach and they will tell you they think the early recruiting process is out of control. Yet, they still commit kids just out of elementary school to keep or stay ahead. If the parent or the NCAA doesn’t stop it, this will never stop. 

The reality is that only a small number of kids get recruited that early when compared the number of kids that will go on to play in college in their respective classes. As our travel ball coach told me when I told them to tell coaches my kid wasn’t ready, if your kid is good enough to be recruited at 11,12, or 13, the coaches will wait for her. 

And on that note, since Coach Walton is the one who committed the 11 year old, I offer this up.... he recruited both of my girls. My youngest is a freshman there now. UF was her first unofficial her freshman year of high school. We told him so, and we also told him we wanted the opportunity to talk to and visit other schools. He encouraged us to do it, and he told us we could take it as slow as we wanted to and that he understood. >> (NadiaM)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Thanks for sharing your experience with us, NadiaM. 
I particularly liked the segment that I put in bold. I believe that is quite true for the most part. 

I have to add this... 
I am most impressed that you have been registered since 2009 - and have made just 7 posts.
This makes me want to see just exactly what those other six posts were about.



Lol, I think all my posts but maybe 2 are on this thread. 😬. This topic drives me crazy, that’s why I posted. We experienced parents need to coach the younger parents. I don’t think most people realize that in the recruiting process the family is vetting their recruiters, as well. I hate that we relinquishing the power we have as parents, and then end upset and unhappy with a process that should be fun and exciting.
3leftturns

Registered:
Posts: 16,102
Reply with quote  #47 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
I understand what you’re saying about kids who stagnate, but from what I have seen in travel ball since 2004, that doesn’t apply to the handful of kids who are the elite of the elite. So, yes, I agree that a lot of kids fall by the wayside. However, I contend the kids that don’t pan out have tell-tale signs that predict that outcome. The kids who dominate early on because they are bigger and more physical mature or just smarter at playing the game than their peers don’t have all the same attributes as the elite of the elite. That’s why coaches can make these types of commitments relatively sure of what they will get years down the road. In other words, the elite of the elite are the complete package even at a young age without physical maturity being a factor. They tend to be stronger, more athletic, more efficient in their movements, lighter on their feet, quicker reflexes, faters and just “get it” easier than their peers. The kids highly recruited at that age already have ability to perform well above their age. So even if they only improve marginally, they tend to be average D1 players at worst. It is usually a pretty safe bet, barring injury.

I hear all of what you are saying. I really do.

But I have seen the elite of the elite commit much later than at age 11 -- after the physical/mental maturation of puberty -- and still not work out.

Football and softball, and I am sure it happens in other sports too.

3leftturns

Registered:
Posts: 16,102
Reply with quote  #48 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
Lol, I think all my posts but maybe 2 are on this thread. 😬. This topic drives me crazy, that’s why I posted. We experienced parents need to coach the younger parents. I don’t think most people realize that in the recruiting process the family is vetting their recruiters, as well. I hate that we relinquishing the power we have as parents, and then end upset and unhappy with a process that should be fun and exciting.
Nadia, you hit on something that I also had written about since this news.

The parents and kid going through this for the first time? Their heads are spinning and all they can see is that candy forest in Willy Wonka's chocolate factory.

I almost feel like people need to contact graduates of a program, or even, brace themselves and call someone who transferred out (especially if that person was getting lots of playing time). Just have the eyes wide open.

But, that first time through.... it's like, with our first baby, I used to put a mirror to her face as she slept to make sure she was breathing!!! LOL. Everything was so wrapped in that combination of excitement and tension.

Second one? Eh, whatever.

Kurosawa

Registered:
Posts: 3,186
Reply with quote  #49 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
I don’t think I understand your question. Are you saying coaches offering scholarships to kids equates to plying a kid with malicious intent? I honestly don’t understand what you mean.


I'm not denying that parents have responsibility. I was responding to your statement, "I think we as parents bear the entire responsibility of overseeing and directing the recruitment process, alleviating the coaches making these offers of any and all responsibility. If offering a 12-year-old a "goodie", whether candy or a scholly, that is plying in my book. What the intent might be is a separate question. In other words, if a parent fails to stand in to forestall an ill-advised commitment by a child unequipped to make such a decision, especially if it is financially beneficial to the parent, then apparently, in your book, it is just too d*mn bad for the kid if it all goes south. Tell me how your statement doesn't make it so?

Without an offer, no commitment can ensue. Period.
NadiaM

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #50 
This is a business deal for both parties. Hence, it is each party’s responsibility to protect their own interest. And precisely because the earlier a commitment is made, the more liability the the family is assuming in the deal. That’s the whole point, parents allow this nonsense to gain the financial benefits of committing, failing to consider that it comes at a disproportionate assumption of risk.

That’s why I said only the parents or the NCAA can stop it. Coaches are simply operating within the current construct of the rules, or lack thereof.
TyCobb

Registered:
Posts: 1,104
Reply with quote  #51 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
This is a business deal for both parties. Hence, it is each party’s responsibility to protect their own interest. And precisely because the earlier a commitment is made, the more liability the the family is assuming in the deal. That’s the whole point, parents allow this nonsense to gain the financial benefits of committing, failing to consider that it comes at a disproportionate assumption of risk.

That’s why I said only the parents or the NCAA can stop it. Coaches are simply operating within the current construct of the rules, or lack thereof.


Are you defending Walton because your relative plays for him? Walton is getting universally ripped for his recent stunts by the whos who of the softball world. There is no way to defend his actions, it is beyond absurd.

NadiaM

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #52 
No, I am not defending Walton, or any other coach, nor am I blaming parents. In fact, I think 11 years old is far too young to commit. I didn't let my own kids commit before they finished their first year of high school. What I am saying, is  everyone is working to protect their own interests. Parents want the best for their kids.  Coaches want to be the most competitive they can be, so I understand the urge to commit on both sides.  

Having said that, parents have the primary responsibility to protect our own kids.  I know that if offers weren't made, committments wouldn't happen, but that's not going to happen in this rat race.  Keep in mind this 11 year old visited other schools, Florida just happened to get the commitment.  

Which brings me back to the point that only the NCAA and parents can stop it.  
Fresh

Registered:
Posts: 5,625
Reply with quote  #53 
You shouldn't condemn a person without knowing the full story. Walton is a good guy, takes care of his players and, evidently, makes some pretty good decisions. While I'm basically against the early verbal phenomenon on the whole, these blue chippers are not going to be the ones negatively affected by it. It's the middle of the roaders whose parents get all nervous about watching other players that they are sure aren't as good, get offers before Susie. They start putting pressure on the coaches and themselves to get her seen. This inevitably bleeds down to Susie, creating a lot of pressure to perform. Takes the fun out and makes ball more of a job. Hope they work something out.
__________________
TyCobb

Registered:
Posts: 1,104
Reply with quote  #54 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
No, I am not defending Walton, or any other coach, nor am I blaming parents. In fact, I think 11 years old is far too young to commit. I didn't let my own kids commit before they finished their first year of high school. What I am saying, is  everyone is working to protect their own interests. Parents want the best for their kids.  Coaches want to be the most competitive they can be, so I understand the urge to commit on both sides.  

Having said that, parents have the primary responsibility to protect our own kids.  I know that if offers weren't made, committments wouldn't happen, but that's not going to happen in this rat race.  Keep in mind this 11 year old visited other schools, Florida just happened to get the commitment.  

Which brings me back to the point that only the NCAA and parents can stop it.  


Good points, but I do think the coaches need to be involved in resolving the issue.
BlueSky

Registered:
Posts: 882
Reply with quote  #55 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
No, I am not defending Walton, or any other coach, nor am I blaming parents. In fact, I think 11 years old is far too young to commit. I didn't let my own kids commit before they finished their first year of high school. What I am saying, is  everyone is working to protect their own interests. Parents want the best for their kids.  Coaches want to be the most competitive they can be, so I understand the urge to commit on both sides.  

Having said that, parents have the primary responsibility to protect our own kids.  I know that if offers weren't made, committments wouldn't happen, but that's not going to happen in this rat race.  Keep in mind this 11 year old visited other schools, Florida just happened to get the commitment.  

Which brings me back to the point that only the NCAA and parents can stop it.  


So NadiaM, Did she choose the school with the best program she wants to pursue?



__________________
 
BlueSky

Registered:
Posts: 882
Reply with quote  #56 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PH2


I find it interesting/funny how those who have benefited from the early commit circus are now trying to backtrack somewhat on the system that they use to their financial advantage.  I guess they're reading the tea leaves and not wanting to be too far out there when things change.  Sure, verbals don't mean anything, but that's a fine line they are walking considering they tout their jamborees and athletic testing to the same age groups everyone is shaking their heads about committing too early.  If verbals don't matter and coaches shouldn't be taking such an interest in pre-HS kids, then why does a girl's pop time and home-to-first time need to be officially recorded at 12 or 13?


Excellent point. Thank you for articulating.

__________________
 
NadiaM

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #57 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueSky


So NadiaM, Did she choose the school with the best program she wants to pursue?


.

She still doesn’t know what she wants to do, so we chose a strong academic school with a broad range of undergraduate degrees. So the answer is no, but we did do our research. Florida’s student athlete support services, academics and alumni network, are no poke in the eye. My kids committed in the fall of their sophomore year and in the summer before sophomore year, respectively. Both could have committed before high school, but we were willing to miss out by holding off. It was and still is my opinion that it was not in their best interest to do otherwise. Others obviously feel differently, and that’s okay. I just see it as business. Everyone has to protect their own interests. I’m not telling anyone what is right for their family or how to run their program. That the NCAA is silenct on this issue is the crux. Parents and coaches are just playing the game.
3leftturns

Registered:
Posts: 16,102
Reply with quote  #58 
Nadia... is this your first to be in the 2,500-mile-away-from-home club?
NadiaM

Registered:
Posts: 62
Reply with quote  #59 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3leftturns
Nadia... is this your first to be in the 2,500-mile-away-from-home club?


Yes. I’m so excited for season to start even though we don’t know if she will be able to play. Counting down the days.
Kurosawa

Registered:
Posts: 3,186
Reply with quote  #60 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NadiaM
This is a business deal for both parties. Hence, it is each party’s responsibility to protect their own interest. And precisely because the earlier a commitment is made, the more liability the the family is assuming in the deal. That’s the whole point, parents allow this nonsense to gain the financial benefits of committing, failing to consider that it comes at a disproportionate assumption of risk. That’s why I said only the parents or the NCAA can stop it. Coaches are simply operating within the current construct of the rules, or lack thereof.


Coaches can't stop themselves from offering 12-year-olds? More likely they don't see any downside, because if she doesn't develop, they can just dump her. So why not?

I do think the coaches are pushing for early contact restrictions, to save themselves from themselves.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.