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spazsdad

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Reply with quote  #151 
Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity

 2014-152015-16
African American31.6%30.1%
American Indian0.4%0.2%
Asian0.8% 
Hispanic/Latino8.8%9.6%
White55.0%55.2%
Multi-Racial3.4%4.9%


District Expenditure per Pupil (2013-14)

$11,114


http://www.areavibes.com/smyrna-de/demographics/
spazsdad

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Reply with quote  #152 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost_1


Broken down by race, the scores also leave much to be desired.

While 32 percent of white students and 47 percent of Asian students scored at proficient or above in math, only 7 percent of black students and 12 percent of Hispanic students did.

Similar gaps were present in reading: 46 percent of white students and 49 percent of Asian students scored at or above proficient, while only 17 percent of black students and 25 percent of Hispanic students did so.



This is the elephant in the room that many do not want to address. Change your tests all you want, change your teachings all you want. The bottom line is it starts at home and until single parent families and kids with non English speaking parents get out of the cycle they are in positive results will be few and far between. Its not a spending issue and throwng more tax dollars will not fix the problems at home
PDad

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Reply with quote  #153 
I suspect there are different experiences by grade-level - i.e. CC is less of an issue for teachers in the beginning grades with rudimentary basics than HS teachers that have to cover a wider range of material with students that aren't prepared for it.
TylerDurden

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Reply with quote  #154 
There are several on both sides that probably think urinating on a forest fire will work too. Especially if you are supplying the water to drink.
Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #155 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey
Delaware 2016 Teacher of the Year


Sandra Hall, a fourth grade teacher at North Smyrna Elementary School in the Smyrna School District, is Delaware’s 2016 State Teacher of the Year.

Hall cited the Common Core State Standards and their aligned state test, the Smarter Assessment, as among the greatest educational issues facing teachers today. They are requiring higher order thinking of her students, who must cite evidence using multiple sources and complete text-based writing assignments using multiple sources. “Students must not only choose correct answers, they must state how they arrived at the conclusion and cite evidence to defend it,” she wrote.

“Students have a better understanding of what is expected of them and understand the what’s and the why’s of learning, providing a greater sense of purpose behind the learning. This approach to teaching does not ‘teach to the test.’ It is more about asking the right type of questions than just teaching the right answers,” she said.

While she believes this is the right approach, she said she understands the frustrations of parents who are challenged by frequently changing educational strategies. “Too often I have heard of frustrated parents who do not feel they can even help their children with homework assignments,” Hall wrote.

Teachers can help with this. Hall said teachers must “have the time, use the resources and make the effort to adopt to the new strategies. They must take every opportunity to continue to learn. Teachers cannot be stagnate in their approach to education. It truly does involve lifelong learning.”



Sometimes we can learn by listening to those top in their field.




Left this out...


Hall also will receive an educational technology package valued at about $18,000 from the SMART Technologies, ULC. Additionally, she will receive: a $1,000 grant for educational/classroom use from American Institutes for Research; grants from the Delaware State Education Association, the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce and the Delaware Professional Standards Board; a State of Delaware Teacher of the Year commemorative plate from the Division of Motor Vehicles; free graduate-level courses from Delaware’s higher education institutions, including a full doctorate program from Wilmington University and University of Delaware; a gold watch from the Delaware State Teachers of the Year Association; a 10-karat gold ring from Jostens; and lunch in Washington D.C. with U.S. Sen. Tom Carper.

 

Other organizations that honored the newly-selected Teacher of the Year include: the Delaware Chief School Officers Association, Delaware Association of School Administrators, Delaware School Boards Association, Delaware State University, Wesley College, Educators Rising and Advantech Incorporated.

 


__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


spazsdad

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Reply with quote  #156 
Oopsie. A Common Core testimonial bought and paid for.
bluedog

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Reply with quote  #157 
Trump will pit common core in the garbage can with all the rotten apple cores......
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #158 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost_1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey
Delaware 2016 Teacher of the Year


Sandra Hall, a fourth grade teacher at North Smyrna Elementary School in the Smyrna School District, is Delaware’s 2016 State Teacher of the Year.

Hall cited the Common Core State Standards and their aligned state test, the Smarter Assessment, as among the greatest educational issues facing teachers today. They are requiring higher order thinking of her students, who must cite evidence using multiple sources and complete text-based writing assignments using multiple sources. “Students must not only choose correct answers, they must state how they arrived at the conclusion and cite evidence to defend it,” she wrote.

“Students have a better understanding of what is expected of them and understand the what’s and the why’s of learning, providing a greater sense of purpose behind the learning. This approach to teaching does not ‘teach to the test.’ It is more about asking the right type of questions than just teaching the right answers,” she said.

While she believes this is the right approach, she said she understands the frustrations of parents who are challenged by frequently changing educational strategies. “Too often I have heard of frustrated parents who do not feel they can even help their children with homework assignments,” Hall wrote.

Teachers can help with this. Hall said teachers must “have the time, use the resources and make the effort to adopt to the new strategies. They must take every opportunity to continue to learn. Teachers cannot be stagnate in their approach to education. It truly does involve lifelong learning.”



Sometimes we can learn by listening to those top in their field.





 



Left this out...


Hall also will receive an educational technology package valued at about $18,000 from the SMART Technologies, ULC. Additionally, she will receive: a $1,000 grant for educational/classroom use from American Institutes for Research; grants from the Delaware State Education Association, the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce and the Delaware Professional Standards Board; a State of Delaware Teacher of the Year commemorative plate from the Division of Motor Vehicles; free graduate-level courses from Delaware’s higher education institutions, including a full doctorate program from Wilmington University and University of Delaware; a gold watch from the Delaware State Teachers of the Year Association; a 10-karat gold ring from Jostens; and lunch in Washington D.C. with U.S. Sen. Tom Carper.

 

Other organizations that honored the newly-selected Teacher of the Year include: the Delaware Chief School Officers Association, Delaware Association of School Administrators, Delaware School Boards Association, Delaware State University, Wesley College, Educators Rising and Advantech Incorporated.

 



Funny how when cornered with facts the local libtard runs to a more "comfortable" thread.  Selective reasoning

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"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #159 
https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2016/04/11/charitable-plutocracy-bill-gates-washington-state-and-the-nuisance-of-democracy/


Once upon a time, the superwealthy endowed their tax-exempt charitable foundations and then turned them over to boards of trustees to run. The trustees would spend the earnings of the endowment to pursue a typically grand but wide-open mission written into the foundation’s charter—like The Rockefeller Foundation’s 1913 mission “to promote the well-being of mankind throughout the world.” Today’s multi-billionaires are a different species of philanthropist; they keep tight control over their foundations while also operating as major political funders—think Michael Bloomberg, Bill Gates, or Walmart heiress Alice Walton. They aim to do good in the world, but each defines “good” idiosyncratically in terms of specific public policies and political goals. They translate their wealth, the work of their foundations, and their celebrity as doers-of-good into influence in the public sphere—much more influence than most citizens have.

Call it charitable plutocracy—a peculiarly American phenomenon, increasingly problematic and in need of greater scrutiny. Like all forms of plutocracy, this one conflicts with democracy, and exactly how these philanthropists coordinate tax-exempt grantmaking with political funding for maximum effect remains largely obscure. What follows is a case study of the way charitable plutocracy operates on the ground. It’s a textbook example of the tug-of-war between government by the people and uber-philanthropists as social engineers.


__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


PDad

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Reply with quote  #160 

I'll bet dollars to donuts this article is very misleading about the money spent in the campaigns - i.e. didn't include money spent by teachers unions because it was spent separate from the anti-charter campaigns. The counter-narrative is the philanthropist donations offset the union money.

Teachers unions generally dominate local elections by outspending their opponents and playing their we-know-whats-best card. I've seen firsthand how this plays out as our local district was taken over by the union's cronies and then the board passed unsustainable pay and retirement benefit increases. They gave almost all the pay raises to teachers nearing retirement to spike their retirement pay and then used the low starting pay as campaign fodder for needing increased funding. They also raided the reserve accounts for construction/maintenance after declaring them excessive and then a couple years later started pushing bond measures to replace the money they redirected. YMMV
Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #161 

More:



The Washington legislature finally passed a charter school law in 2004. Opponents responded by petitioning for a ballot measure to repeal the law. Mobilized by the teachers unions, League of Women Voters, state Democratic Party, and the Seattle School Board, they raised $1.3 million for the campaign. The unions contributed the most: the Washington Education Association gave $601,000, and the National Education Association gave $500,000.5

Charter school supporters raised three times as much—$3.9 million. Most of it came from three education-reform political funder-philanthropists, who donated about $1 million each: Bill Gates, who had recently made education reform the main focus of his domestic philanthropy; Walmart heir John T. Walton (from Wyoming), who advocated charters and tax-funded vouchers for parents to use for private-school tuition; and Donald Fisher (from California), founder of Gap and a major donor to the KIPP chain of charter schools.6

When philanthropists finance political campaigns, they act as individual citizens spending their personal wealth, not as the heads of tax-exempt, charitable foundations. Federal and state laws bar private foundations from political activity. Although the regulations have ambiguities and loopholes, high-profile philanthropists are usually careful about keeping foundation and personal monies separate and using only the latter to fund political campaigns.

Although outspent three to one, charter school opponents in Washington won an impressive victory in 2004. The law was repealed by a vote of 58.3 percent to 41.7 percent.7

This big-money face-off—multibillionaire philanthropists against teachers unions—turned out to be a prototype repeated across the country in scores of education-reform campaigns in the last decade. Millions of dollars regularly pour into races for local and state school boards and for district and state school superintendents, as well as for education ballot initiatives. The money comes from both in state and out of state. Twenty years ago, these contests cost little to run; the stakes were limited. Now, the money is huge, and the ramifications are national: the nature and control of public education is being decided.


__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #162 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDad

I'll bet dollars to donuts this article is very misleading about the money spent in the campaigns - i.e. didn't include money spent by teachers unions because it was spent separate from the anti-charter campaigns. The counter-narrative is the philanthropist donations offset the union money.

Teachers unions generally dominate local elections by outspending their opponents and playing their we-know-whats-best card. I've seen firsthand how this plays out as our local district was taken over by the union's cronies and then the board passed unsustainable pay and retirement benefit increases. They gave almost all the pay raises to teachers nearing retirement to spike their retirement pay and then used the low starting pay as campaign fodder for needing increased funding. They also raided the reserve accounts for construction/maintenance after declaring them excessive and then a couple years later started pushing bond measures to replace the money they redirected. YMMV





Having been in the crosshairs of the local affiliate of the OEA, you will find no love for the NEA/AFT here. I watched them tear apart a pretty good school by electing their proxies to the board.

__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


PDad

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Reply with quote  #163 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost_1
When philanthropists finance political campaigns, they act as individual citizens spending their personal wealth, not as the heads of tax-exempt, charitable foundations. Federal and state laws bar private foundations from political activity. Although the regulations have ambiguities and loopholes, high-profile philanthropists are usually careful about keeping foundation and personal monies separate and using only the latter to fund political campaigns.

IMO, this portion undermines the article's focus on "philanthropists" as villains. I don't see any difference in contributions from wealthy donors that have an education-focused philanthropy and ones that don't.

Quote:
This big-money face-off—multibillionaire philanthropists against teachers unions—turned out to be a prototype repeated across the country in scores of education-reform campaigns in the last decade. Millions of dollars regularly pour into races for local and state school boards and for district and state school superintendents, as well as for education ballot initiatives. The money comes from both in state and out of state. Twenty years ago, these contests cost little to run; the stakes were limited. Now, the money is huge, and the ramifications are national: the nature and control of public education is being decided.

IMO, the unions are crying foul because they're losing control since they can't outspend the opposition like they have in the past.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost_1
Having been in the crosshairs of the local affiliate of the OEA, you will find no love for the NEA/AFT here. I watched them tear apart a pretty good school by electing their proxies to the board.

I'm not familiar with the OEA. Are they a local org (e.g. state/city) similar to the NEA?
Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #164 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDad




I'm not familiar with the OEA. Are they a local org (e.g. state/city) similar to the NEA?



Oklahoma Education Association


__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #165 
http://hechingerreport.org/five-years-adopting-common-core-kentuckys-black-white-achievement-gap-widening/
__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #166 
Keep 'em comin' Lost
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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
TylerDurden

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Reply with quote  #167 
Come on guys - a few democrats and republicans like it, let's give it a shot!
Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #168 
http://www.wsj.com/articles/college-isnt-always-the-answer-1464300544



There’s a disconnect between supply (what the education system produces) and demand (what employers seek). Rather than trying to shuffle young people off to college three months after they graduate from high school, policy makers should support alternative routes to the education and training required for high-quality jobs. Plenty of successful examples have sprung up around the country.


Many who earn a bachelor’s degree are not prepared to enter the workforce. A new learning ecosystem is emerging outside of traditional higher education to assist them. General Assembly offers courses on topics like Web design, and Koru teaches practical business skills. Students can also use free or inexpensive online courses from edX and Lynda.com to build skills that can help them get that first job.

There is no silver bullet for reducing unemployment and reversing wage stagnation. Sending more high-school graduates to get traditional bachelor’s degrees, free or not, isn’t the answer. Embracing some of these locally tested ideas on a national scale would be a good start.


__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #169 
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/editorials/la-ed-gates-education-20160601-snap-story.html



Tucked away in a letter from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation last week, along with proud notes about the foundation’s efforts to fight smoking and tropical diseases and its other accomplishments, was a section on education. Its tone was unmistakably chastened.

“We’re facing the fact that it is a real struggle to make systemwide change,” wrote the foundation’s CEO, Sue Desmond-Hellman. And a few lines later: “It is really tough to create more great public schools.”

 

The Gates Foundation’s first significant foray into education reform, in 1999, revolved around Bill Gates’ conviction that the big problem with high schools was their size. Students would be better off in smaller schools of no more than 500, he believed. The foundation funded the creation of smaller schools, until its own study found that the size of the school didn’t make much difference in student performance. When the foundation moved on, school districts were left with costlier-to-run small schools.

Then the foundation set its sights on improving teaching, specifically through evaluating and rewarding good teaching. But it was not always successful. In 2009, it pledged a gift of up to $100 million to the Hillsborough County, Fla., schools to fund bonuses for high-performing teachers, to revamp teacher evaluations and to fire the lowest-performing 5%. In return, the school district promised to match the funds. But, according to reports in the Tampa Bay Times, the Gates Foundation changed its mind about the value of bonuses and stopped short of giving the last $20 million; costs ballooned beyond expectations, the schools were left with too big a tab and the least-experienced teachers still ended up at low-income schools. The program, evaluation system and all, was dumped.

 

The Gates Foundation strongly supported the proposed Common Core curriculum standards, helping to bankroll not just their development, but the political effort to have them quickly adopted and implemented by states. Here, Desmond-Hellmann wrote in her May letter, the foundation also stumbled. The too-quick introduction of Common Core, and attempts in many states to hold schools and teachers immediately accountable for a very different form of teaching, led to a public backlash.

“Unfortunately, our foundation underestimated the level of resources and support required for our public education systems to be well-equipped to implement the standards,” Desmond-Hellmann wrote. “We missed an early opportunity to sufficiently engage educators — particularly teachers — but also parents and communities, so that the benefits of the standards could take flight from the beginning.

“This has been a challenging lesson for us to absorb, but we take it to heart. The mission of improving education in America is both vast and complicated, and the Gates Foundation doesn’t have all the answers.”

It was a remarkable admission for a foundation that had often acted as though it did have all the answers. Today, the Gates Foundation is clearly rethinking its bust-the-walls-down strategy on education — as it should. And so should the politicians and policymakers, from the federal level to the local, who have given the educational wishes of Bill and Melinda Gates and other well-meaning  philanthropists and foundations too much sway in recent years over how schools are run.

That’s not to say wealthy reformers have nothing to offer public schools. They’ve funded some outstanding charter schools for low-income students. They’ve helped bring healthcare to schools. They’ve funded arts programs.




The Gates Foundation, according to Desmond-Hellmann’s letter, is now working more on providing Common Core-aligned materials to classrooms, including free digital content that could replace costly textbooks, and a website where teachers can review educational materials. That’s great: Financial support for Common Core isn’t a bad thing. When the standards are implemented well, which isn’t easy, they ought to develop better reading, writing and thinking skills.

But the Gates Foundation has spent so much money — more than $3 billion since 1999 — that it took on an unhealthy amount of power in the setting of education policy. Former foundation staff members ended up in high positions in the U.S. Department of Education — and, in the case of John Deasy, at the head of the Los Angeles Unified School District. The foundation’s teacher-evaluation push led to an overemphasis on counting student test scores as a major portion of teachers’ performance ratings — even though Gates himself eventually warned against moving too hastily or carelessly in that direction. Now several of the states that quickly embraced that method of evaluating teachers are backing away from it.

Philanthropists are not generally education experts, and even if they hire scholars and experts, public officials shouldn’t be allowing them to set the policy agenda for the nation’s public schools. The Gates experience teaches once again that educational silver bullets are in short supply and that some educational trends live only a little longer than mayflies.

__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #170 
Thanks for the article Lost. When will the left quit experimenting and using our young people as their lab rats?
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"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #171 
[CZHU-pOUMAI9yke]
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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
CoachB25

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Reply with quote  #172 
Quote:
Originally Posted by keepinitreal
[CZHU-pOUMAI9yke]


This should go down as one of the all time classics!
Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #173 
http://neatoday.org/2016/06/24/colorado-math-teacher-tells-congress-get-essa-right/
__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #174 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/is-it-becoming-too-hard-to-fail-schools-are-shifting-toward-no-zero-grading-policies/2016/07/05/3c464f5e-3cb0-11e6-80bc-d06711fd2125_story.html


Is it becoming too hard to fail? Schools are shifting toward no-zero grading policies



School districts in the Washington area and across the country are adopting grading practices that make it more difficult for students to flunk classes, that give students opportunities to retake exams or turn in late work, and that discourage or prohibit teachers from giving out zeroes.

The policies have stirred debates about the purpose of issuing academic grades and whether they should be used to punish, motivate or purely represent what students have learned in class. Some regard it as the latest in a line of ideas intended to keep students progressing through school and heading toward graduation, akin in some ways to practices like social promotion.

Under a new policy in Virginia’s Fairfax County, one of the nation’s largest school systems, middle and high school students can earn no lower than a score of 50 if they make a “reasonable attempt” to complete work. And for the first time this year, high school teachers who were going to fail a student had to reevaluate the student using “quality points,” making an F less detrimental to a student’s final grade. Prince George’s County in Maryland will limit failing grades to a 50 percent minimum score when students show a “good-faith effort.”

Proponents of the changes­ say the new grading systems are more fair and end up being more conducive to learning, encouraging students to catch up when they fall behind rather than just giving up. Many believe that giving a student a score of zero for an F — rather than, say, a score of 50 — on even just one bad assignment can doom students because climbing back to a passing grade can seem almost mathematically impossible. And such failures can put students on a path to dropping out before graduation.

But many are critical of the shift, arguing that teachers are losing important tools to enforce diligence and prepare students for college and the workplace. They say that artificially boosting student grades can mask failure and push students through who don’t know the material they need to know to actually succeed.

“It reflects this soft bigotry of low expectations around student effort and student behavior,” said Michael Petrilli, president of the Fordham Institute, a right-leaning think tank. He said policies that cut students slack send the message that hard work and homework are not important. “Is it because we think certain groups of kids aren’t capable of them?”

Rick Wormeli, a grading expert who has worked with schools in the D.C. region and across the country, says grading changes are on the rise nationally, including allowing test retakes and revamping grading systems in ways designed to better reflect how much a student has actually learned. He estimates more than half of U.S. schools are investigating such changes­ or have made revisions in recent years. “Not everyone learns the same way or at the same pace,” he said.

The move is intended to give students a chance to recover even if they fail an assignment or a grading period. Some consider a score of zero to be mathematically unjust in any case: a student who earns a zero and then a perfect score on the following assignment has an average of 50 percent — still an F in most grading systems.

“The bottom line is that a zero on the 100-point scale distorts a student’s overall grade,” said Gregory Hood, principal of James Madison High School in Fairfax County. “A zero provides no information about what a student has learned, and it negatively impacts a student’s grade when averaged with other grades.”

Many school systems also are moving toward “standards-based grading,” which emphasizes evaluating students on what they ultimately learn rather than on work habits, student effort, punctuality or homework.

The philosophy has driven Fairfax County to allow students to turn in work late and to retake major exams if they score below 80 percent; the county also limits homework to 10 percent of a student’s grade. Prince George’s officials will not allow behavior or attendance as factors in academic grades and will give students a second chance to improve their score on certain tests or assignments.

“Grades are really supposed to be about reflecting student achievement,” said Noel Klimenko, director of pre-K through 12th grade curriculum and instruction for Fairfax County schools.

Kevin Hickerson, the president-elect of the Fairfax Education Association, which represents more than 4,000 current and retired school employees, said the new policies push students to keep trying if they do not understand a concept the first time around. It is “erasing the boundaries of time because in the end all teachers are about making sure that students have had proficiency or mastered a concept,” Hickerson said.

Segun Eubanks, chairman of the Prince George’s school board, said that such changes­ are no “magic elixir” for kids who struggle but can keep them engaged, knowing they still have a chance to pass or succeed. “It gives them more opportunities to show their skills and knowledge, and to improve,” he said.

Gaining popularity nationwide, such rethinking of grades already is in place in some individual school districts. Montgomery County has used a “50-percent rule” — prohibiting the use of the lowest failing grades when students make good-faith efforts — for nearly a decade. While teachers have adjusted to the ­changes, some still do not favor the 50-percent rule. And others suggest that the results can be mixed.

Amy Watkins, a math teacher at Montgomery’s Walter Johnson High School, said the practice helps students who really try but may bomb a test; the poor grade counts but it’s not impossible to overcome. The downside, she said, is that it also helps some students earn credit for a course “when they have not mastered any of the content.” Watkins said these are often students who go on to need remedial classes­ in college.

Sam Hedenberg, who teaches English to special education students at Fairfax’s Mount Vernon High School, has seen the new ideas in action. Two years ago, administrators at his school barred teachers from giving zeroes, making the lowest possible score a 53. “It definitely provides that opportunity for a kid to catch up,” Hedenberg said.

But he also has seen students game the system. One student was able to pass his class even though he skipped several essay-writing assignments. “Many students have already started to figure out that they don’t have to do very much but they can still pass,” he said.

Some teachers think that grades absolutely should reflect a student’s work habits — such as whether they participate in class or turn in work on time — and Hedenberg said learning to meet deadlines and to work diligently should be a part of the curriculum.

Theresa Mitchell Dudley, president of the Prince George’s County Educators’ Association, said that 42 to 69 percent of high school teachers who responded to a recent survey voiced concerns about some of the key recommended ­changes.

“We have no problem being fair to students,” she said. “But if they are not doing the work and not performing, and we give them a grade they did not earn, how does that make them college and career ready?”

Dudley said that the union, which represents more than 10,000 employees, is working with district officials to tweak grading proposals and that fairness to students must be balanced with a need for accountability.

“You can’t go to an employer and say, ‘Here’s my work, it’s two weeks late,’ and expect that your boss is not going to fire you,” she said.

Thomas R. Guskey, an education professor at the University of Kentucky who has studied grading, said the standard A through F grading system has remained unchanged for more than a century. He has proposed upending it entirely, arguing that students should get two grades: one that reflects whether a student has mastered the content and a second that evaluates what he calls “process criteria,” things such as whether a student collaborates well, participates in class discussions and turns in work on time. He has piloted the model at several Kentucky schools.

He said school systems should not be taking work habits — such as homework, punctuality and effort — out of the grading equation.

“Those are all really good, but they’re different than achievement, and we need to report them separately,” Guskey said.










 


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Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #175 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2016/08/18/the-seven-deadly-sins-of-common-core-by-an-english-teacher/?ref=yfp


For years now, the Common Core State Standards have been at the center of a national controversy over public education. Supporters say the standards, being used in most states, will improve public education, raising the standards that had formerly been used in most states. Critics say otherwise; earlier this year, for example, more than 100 education researchers in California collectively issued a research brief saying that there is no “compelling” evidence that the Common Core State Standards will improve the quality of education for children or close the achievement gap. (They also labeled new Common Core standardized tests as lacking “validity, reliability and fairness.”)

__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #176 
This will get me a big bunch of crickets.......




https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2016/03/16/education-researchers-blast-common-core-standards-urge-ban-on-high-stakes-tests/?tid=a_inl



More than 100 education researchers in California have joined in a call for an end to high-stakes testing, saying that there is no “compelling” evidence to support the idea that the Common Core State Standards will improve the quality of education for children or close the achievement gap, and that Common Core assessments lack “validity, reliability and fairness.”

The California Alliance of Researchers for Equity in Education,  a statewide collaborative of university-based education researchers, recently released a research brief (see in full below below) describing concerns with the Common Core standards and the assessments being given to millions of students in California and other states around the country this spring.

The researchers, from public and private universities in California —  including Stanford University, UCLA, and the University of California Berkeley — say that the Common Core standards themselves do not accomplish what supporters said they would and that linking them to high-stakes tests actually harms students. The brief says:

 Although proponents argue that the CCSS promotes critical thinking skills and student-centered learning (instead of rote learning), research demonstrates that imposed standards, when linked with high-stakes testing, not only deprofessionalizes teaching  and narrows the curriculum,  but in so doing, also reduces the quality of education and student learning, engagement, and success. The impact is also on student psychological well-being: Without an understanding that the scores have not been proven to be valid or fair for determining proficiency or college readiness, students and their parents are likely to internalize failing labels with corresponding beliefs about academic potential. Like I said back in the first page, instruction will level out at the lowest common denominator, IE a race to the middle.


__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #177 

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If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


CoachB25

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Reply with quote  #178 
That is unbelievable.  Then, to think that a student was suspended from a school system for holding a Trump sign. 
EarlyGrayce

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Reply with quote  #179 
They just rolled the first car built with the new common core math off of the assembly line.......

http://i.imgur.com/gsDdNVy.jpg

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"She Packed My Bags Last Night, Pre-Flight, Zero Hour Nine A.M."
Lost_1

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Reply with quote  #180 
Classic deweyism



Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey
Lost 1 - Don't ask me any questions on this subject as I know almost nothing about it.  I was hoping some of the more experienced teachers here might explain why Gov. Kasich and Gov. Bush support this plan and so many other Republicans don't.  I was looking for some understanding of their differences.  One of these articles suggested it isn't factual in nature, it's political.  Republicans couldn't support an idea Obama favored.  Is that true? 

__________________
If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. - Dr. Martin Luther King


“Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to say what they like, but if anyone else says anything back, that is an outrage.” Winston S. Churchill


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