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keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #1 
Here you go buddy, make your case without mentioning Cruz, Cankles or Curious George.

First, were you in Indiana this week?


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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
Dewey

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Reply with quote  #2 
Yes, watch this video and ask yourself if these Trumpies are rising up against a supposed failed Obama Presidency or rising up against the GOP.  I rest my case.
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President Obama kept Republicans out of the White House for 8 years and added two excellent justices to the Supreme Court.  Those two things alone make him one of our greatest Presidents of my lifetime.
TylerDurden

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thread Derailed
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #4 
dumbass dewy, did you hear the first thing this guy said of reasons why he liked Trump?  He said he'd build the wall.  We have all told your clan to secure the border, obama instead OPENED the border with executive actions and orders to the Border Patrol to stand down.  The bastards in office did not take the populace seriously, bluedog can make sure the wall gets built.

Now since you rest your case we won't need anymore of your stupidity.

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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey
Yes, watch this video and ask yourself if these Trumpies are rising up against a supposed failed Obama Presidency or rising up against the GOP.  I rest my case.


You rest your case after watching this hillbilly?  What a complete moron you and he make.  This is probably the first time this hillbilly has voted in his life.  

FYI, Cruz is Tea Party not GOP.  You have always made such great efforts differentiating the two in the past

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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #6 

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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #7 




EX:

Many Americans look at the pathological lies of presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump and wonder quietly to themselves how we reached this point.

Two words: Barack Obama.


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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
bluedog

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Reply with quote  #8 
Two more: George Bush

Two more: Mitt Romney

Two more: John McCain

Possibly coming soon: Paul Ryan
EarlyGrayce

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Reply with quote  #9 
Love this thread, thanks kiir.  As I would never vote for Hill or Bernie, for many reasons, and I personally don't like the 'no-vote-for-anyone' logic, I'll be voting for Donald. But if I have to voice a reason (besides those), my reason is that I agree with the excerpt below. Our country indeed has a 'selective memory', and a Donald presidency is gonna rip that freaking band aid off the corrosion wound of our country.

"Would a Trump presidency fix our national problems? Probably not. But, his presidency should not be viewed through that lens. Rather, think of it like this: President Trump is perfectly suited to be the commander-in-chief of political incorrectness and international blunders. He will rip the bandage that covers the corrosion of our country. A Trump presidency would likely produce alarming missteps, yet in the process it would expose the real problems our nation faces—problems that, if not corrected today, will cause far graver damage tomorrow. The worse he does, the better it may be be for the country.
Let me use an analogy: When we maintain a dreadful diet, we steadily worsen our health. We somehow think that heart conditions happen to other people, to our neighbors and strangers on TV. But never to us. The relative ease of doing nothing trumps (no pun intended) the fear of negative outcomes. Today, as a nation we have clogged the walls of our arteries. That is where President Trump comes in.
The electorate that supports Trump is part of our national fabric, and it is playing the role of an organism that stimulates the stroke our society needs. They anticipate that President Trump will rip off that bandage and bring about a shock of awareness as to how things are, regardless of how politically incorrect or suicidal that may appear. They are fighting against our selective memory.
We are still an exceptional country. We are relatively young and capable of overcoming Trump-induced problems. He can’t do the sensational damage that pundits or his opponents describe. In a mature political structure like the U.S., there are formidable checks and balances, political and institutional constraints, and constitutional hurdles that prevent any one person from bringing upon catastrophic damage. But Trump can do enough. As in health, a minor stroke might be what we need to “make America great again.”


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"She Packed My Bags Last Night, Pre-Flight, Zero Hour Nine A.M."
bluedog

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Reply with quote  #10 
And, this would be a huge step forward for America......Exposing the graft and corruption is the first step in escaping it's grasp!
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #11 
[Ch6AYT_XIAAy3dh]
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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
woody

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerDurden
Thread Derailed


Where is the transgender symbol????

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Anarcho Capitalism. Get some, and no you can't have any of my money to live off of you Socialist Democrat.

"IT'S GOOD TO BE DA KING"
woody

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EarlyGrayce
Love this thread, thanks kiir.  As I would never vote for Hill or Bernie, for many reasons, and I personally don't like the 'no-vote-for-anyone' logic, I'll be voting for Donald. But if I have to voice a reason (besides those), my reason is that I agree with the excerpt below. Our country indeed has a 'selective memory', and a Donald presidency is gonna rip that freaking band aid off the corrosion wound of our country.

"Would a Trump presidency fix our national problems? Probably not. But, his presidency should not be viewed through that lens. Rather, think of it like this: President Trump is perfectly suited to be the commander-in-chief of political incorrectness and international blunders. He will rip the bandage that covers the corrosion of our country. A Trump presidency would likely produce alarming missteps, yet in the process it would expose the real problems our nation faces—problems that, if not corrected today, will cause far graver damage tomorrow. The worse he does, the better it may be be for the country.
Let me use an analogy: When we maintain a dreadful diet, we steadily worsen our health. We somehow think that heart conditions happen to other people, to our neighbors and strangers on TV. But never to us. The relative ease of doing nothing trumps (no pun intended) the fear of negative outcomes. Today, as a nation we have clogged the walls of our arteries. That is where President Trump comes in.
The electorate that supports Trump is part of our national fabric, and it is playing the role of an organism that stimulates the stroke our society needs. They anticipate that President Trump will rip off that bandage and bring about a shock of awareness as to how things are, regardless of how politically incorrect or suicidal that may appear. They are fighting against our selective memory.
We are still an exceptional country. We are relatively young and capable of overcoming Trump-induced problems. He can’t do the sensational damage that pundits or his opponents describe. In a mature political structure like the U.S., there are formidable checks and balances, political and institutional constraints, and constitutional hurdles that prevent any one person from bringing upon catastrophic damage. But Trump can do enough. As in health, a minor stroke might be what we need to “make America great again.”



I will be standing by with a gallon jug of Merthiolate to dump on the festered scab after it is ripped off.

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Anarcho Capitalism. Get some, and no you can't have any of my money to live off of you Socialist Democrat.

"IT'S GOOD TO BE DA KING"
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #14 
HIGH-ALERT DOG!!!!!!

BLM coming after your man.  HIGH-ALERT for our future POTUS




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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #15 
Serious kill Trump movement going on.  Never heard of a kill obama movement but dog, your man needs protection it would seem.  Get you "Kill Donald Trump"  tshirt


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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
bluedog

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Reply with quote  #16 
When you threaten to bust-up gangs and seal our borders, you'll make enemies of people with despicable intentions...........

Proves that Trump is right..........Some very evil people have illegally infiltrated America and it's time to do something about it..... 
CoachB25

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Reply with quote  #17 
Anyone threatening to kill or harm any candidate regardless of party needs to be prosecuted with the full extent of the law.  It should be easy enough to track whomever posted those videos. 
TylerDurden

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Reply with quote  #18 
Agreed Coach - unfortunately our DOJ is more interested in Hands up Don't Shoot.
TylerDurden

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedog
When you threaten to bust-up gangs and seal our borders, you'll make enemies of people with despicable intentions...........

Proves that Trump is right..........Some very evil people have illegally infiltrated America and it's time to do something about it..... 


I heard Drumph was going to send Mitt Romney and Rafael Cruz after them.
Dewey

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Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerDurden
Agreed Coach - unfortunately our DOJ is more interested in Hands up Don't Shoot.


This is nothing but a completely false statement.  Next Tyler will be saying Democrats are more interested in criminal undocumented being freed than police being shot and killed.

http://newsone.com/2788994/joshua-phillip-klimas-arrested-for-threatening-to-kill-president-obama/


CoachB - I completely agree with you.  Those who make threats should be prosecuted. 

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President Obama kept Republicans out of the White House for 8 years and added two excellent justices to the Supreme Court.  Those two things alone make him one of our greatest Presidents of my lifetime.
TylerDurden

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Reply with quote  #21 
show me the investigations into the death threats to candidates and then you can say it's a completely false statement. They wasted money and time chasing a false narrative in Ferguson, but that is an uncomfortable truth to those on the left.

As for the comment about killing cops, I won't dignify that with a response. I have said multiple times democrats aren't for immigrants committing crimes, it's you that pushes the narative that rhe GOP likes these things. I don't think you actually believe these things, you are just looking for a rise out of people. Pretty low brow IMO.
mikec

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachB25
Anyone threatening to kill or harm any candidate regardless of party needs to be prosecuted with the full extent of the law.  It should be easy enough to track whomever posted those videos. 


Agreed.
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Maybe Trump can make a deal with the weatherman and between the two of them, they can end California’s drought?

__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Posts: 22,659
Reply with quote  #24 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The Psychological Quirk That Explains Why You Love Donald Trump

The popularity of the GOP front-runner can be explained by the Dunning-Kruger Effect.

 

May 25, 2016

160524-trump-gty-1160.jpg

Getty

Many commentators have argued that Donald Trump’s dominance in the GOP presidential race can be largely explained by ignorance; his candidacy, after all, is most popular among Republican voters without college degrees. Their expertise about current affairs is too fractured and full of holes to spot that only 9 percent of Trump’s statements are “true” or “mostly” true, according to PolitiFact, whereas 57 percent are “false” or “mostly false”—the remainder being “pants on fire” untruths. Trump himself has memorably declared: “I love the poorly educated.”

But as a psychologist who has studied human behavior—including voter behavior—for decades, I think there is something deeper going on. The problem isn’t that voters are too uninformed. It is that they don’tknow just how uninformed they are.

We have found this pattern in logical reasoning, grammar, emotional intelligence, financial literacy, numeracy, firearm care and safety, debate skill, and college coursework. Others have found a similar lack of insight among poor chess players, unskilled medical lab technicians, medical students unsuccessfully completing an obstetrics/gynecology rotation, and people failing a test on performing CPR.

This syndrome may well be the key to the Trump voter—and perhaps even to the man himself. Trump has served up numerous illustrative examples of the effect as he continues his confident audition to be leader of the free world even as he seems to lack crucial information about the job. In a December debate he appeared ignorant of what the nuclear triad is. Elsewhere, he has mused that Japan and South Korea should develop their own nuclear weapons—casually reversing decades of U.S. foreign policy.

Many commentators have pointed to these confident missteps as products of Trump’s alleged narcissism and egotism. My take would be that it's the other way around. Not seeing the mistakes for what they are allows any potential narcissism and egotism to expand unchecked.

In voters, lack of expertise would be lamentable but perhaps not so worrisome if people had some sense of how imperfect their civic knowledge is. If they did, they could repair it. But the Dunning-Kruger Effect suggests something different. It suggests that some voters, especially those facing significant distress in their life, might like some of what they hear from Trump, but they do not know enough to hold him accountable for the serious gaffes he makes. They fail to recognize those gaffes as missteps.

Here is more evidence. In a telling series of experiments, Paul Fernbach and colleagues asked political partisans to rate their understanding of various social policies, such as imposing sanctions on Iran, instituting a flat tax, or establishing a single-payer health system.

Survey takers expressed a good deal of confidence about their expertise. Or rather, they did until researchers put that understanding to the test by asking them to describe in detail the mechanics of two of the policies under question. This challenge led survey takers to realize that their understanding was mostly an illusion. It also led them to moderate their stances about those policies and to donate less money, earned in the experiment, to like-minded political advocacy groups.

Again, the key to the Dunning-Kruger Effect is not that unknowledgeable voters are uninformed; it is that they are often misinformed—their heads filled with false data, facts and theories that can lead to misguided conclusions held with tenacious confidence and extreme partisanship, perhaps some that make them nod in agreement with Trump at his rallies.

Trump himself also exemplifies this exact pattern, showing how the Dunning-Kruger Effect can lead to what seems an indomitable sense of certainty. All it takes is not knowing the point at which the proper application of a sensible idea turns into malpractice.

For example, in a CNBC interview, Trump suggested that the U.S. government debt could easily be reduced by asking federal bondholders to “take a haircut,” agreeing to receive a little less than the bond’s full face value if the U.S. economy ran into trouble. In a sense, this is a sensible idea commonly applied—at least in business, where companies commonly renegotiate the terms of their debt.

But stretching it to governmental finance strains reason beyond acceptability. And in his suggestion, Trump illustrated not knowing the horror show of consequences his seemingly modest proposal would produce. For the U.S. government, his suggestion would produce no less than an unprecedented earthquake in world finance. It would represent the de facto default of the U.S. on its debt—and the U.S. government has paid its debt in full since the time of Alexander Hamilton. The certainty and safety imbued in U.S. Treasury bonds is the bedrock upon which much of world finance rests.

Even suggesting that these bonds pay back less than 100 percent would be cause for future buyers to demand higher interest rates, thus costing the U.S. government, and taxpayer, untold millions of dollars, and risking the health of the American economy.

This misinformation problem can live in voters, too, as shown in a 2015 survey about the proposed Common Core standards for education. A full 41 percent claimed the new standards would prompt more frequent testing within California schools. That was untrue. Only 18 percent accurately stated that the level of testing would stay the same. Further, 35 percent mistakenly asserted that the standards went beyond math and English instruction. Only 28 percent correctly reported that the standards were constrained to those two topics. And 34 percent falsely claimed that the federal government would require California to adopt the Common Core. Only 21 percent accurately understood this was not so.

But what is more interesting—and troubling—were the responses of survey takers who claimed they knew “a lot” about the new standards. What these “informed” citizens “knew” trended toward the false rather than the true. For example, 52 percent thought the standards applied beyond math and English (versus 32 percent who got it right). And 57 percent believed the standards mandated more testing (versus 31 percent who correctly understood that it did not). These misconceptions mattered: To the extent that survey takers endorsed these misconceptions, they opposed the Common Core.

My research colleagues and I have found similar evidence that voters who think they are informed may be carrying a good deal of misinformation in their heads. In an unpublished study, we surveyed people the day after the 2014 midterm elections, asking them whether they had voted. Our key question was who was most likely to have voted: informed, uninformed, or misinformed citizens.

We found that voting was strongly tied to one thing—whether those who took the survey thought of themselves as “well-informed” citizens. But perceiving oneself as informed was not necessarily tied to, um, being well-informed.

To be sure, well-informed voters accurately endorsed true statements about economic and social conditions in the U.S.—just as long as those statements agreed with their politics. Conservatives truthfully claimed that the U.S. poverty rate had gone up during the Obama administration; liberals rightfully asserted that the unemployment rate had dropped.

But both groups also endorsed falsehoods agreeable to their politics. Thus, all told, it was the political lean of the fact that mattered much more than its truth-value in determining whether respondents believed it. And endorsing partisan facts both true and false led to perceptions that one was an informed citizen, and then to a greater likelihood of voting.

Given all this misinformation, confidently held, it is no wonder that Trump causes no outrage or scandal among those voters who find his views congenial.

But why now? If voters can be so misinformed that they don’t know that they are misinformed, why only now has a candidate like Trump arisen? My take is that the conditions for the Trump phenomenon have been in place for a long time. At least as long as quantitative survey data have been collected, citizens have shown themselves to be relatively ill-informed and incoherent on political and historical matters. As way back as 1943, a survey revealed that only 25 percent of college freshmen knew that Abraham Lincoln was president during the Civil War.

All it took was a candidate to come along too inexperienced to avoid making policy gaffes, at least gaffes that violate received wisdom, with voters too uninformed to see the violations. Usually, those candidates make their mistakes off in some youthful election to their state legislature, or in small-town mayoral race or contest for class president. It’s not a surprise that someone trying out a brand new career at the presidential level would make gaffes that voters, in a rebellious mood, would forgive but more likely not even see.

But the Dunning-Kruger perspective also suggests a cautionary tale that extends well beyond the Trump voter. The Trump phenomenon may provide only an extravagant and visible example in which voters fail to spot a political figure who seems to be making it up as he goes along.

But the key lesson of the Dunning-Kruger framework is that it applies to all of us, sooner or later. Each of us at some point reaches the limits of our expertise and knowledge. Those limits make our misjudgments that lie beyond those boundaries undetectable to us.

As such, if we find ourselves worried about the apparent gullibility of the Trump voter, which may be flamboyant and obvious, we should surely worry about our own naive political opinions that are likely to be more nuanced, subtle, and invisible—but perhaps no less consequential. We all run the risk of being too ill-informed to notice when our own favored candidates or national leaders make catastrophic misjudgments.

To be sure, I don’t wish to leave the reader with a fatal hesitation about supporting any candidate. All I am saying is trust, but verify.

Thomas Jefferson once observed that “if a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." The Trump phenomenon makes visible something that has been true for quite some time now. As a citizenry, we can be massively ill-informed. Yet, our society remains relatively free.

How have we managed so far to maintain what Jefferson suggested could never be? And how do we ensure this miracle of democracy continues? This is the real issue. And it will be with us far after the Trumpian political revolution or reality TV spectacle, depending on how you see it, has long flickered off the electronic screens of our cultural theater.





__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
EarlyGrayce

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Posts: 4,142
Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by keepinitreal

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The Psychological Quirk That Explains Why You Love Donald Trump

The popularity of the GOP front-runner can be explained by the Dunning-Kruger Effect.

 

May 25, 2016

160524-trump-gty-1160.jpg

 





Interesting. No doubt, our country has always been full of ill-informed and un-self-aware voters. But, to me, this quote from the article points out the crux of the difference this time with many trump loyalists....

"All it took was a candidate to come along too inexperienced to avoid making policy gaffes, at least gaffes that violate received wisdom, with voters too uninformed to see the violations."

The misunderstanding that this author and other Trump naysayers have is that, many voters are fed up and done with "the received wisdom" of politics as usual. The premise of this article is that candidates must adhere to the same failed politics that we have been mired in for the last 70 years, and to not do so, is a gaffe. I suspect that Trump supporters understand the 'gaffes' better than this author says. They just don't consider them gaffes.  They consider them a 'tearing off of the band aid' of politics as usual (defining politics as usual as only saying things that are consistent with politically correct stances and are consistent with the party benefactors). 

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"She Packed My Bags Last Night, Pre-Flight, Zero Hour Nine A.M."
CoachB25

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Reply with quote  #26 
So, I am uninformed about Common Core.  Got it.  That article is very offensive in that it is actually a type of class warfare.  The sterotypes suggest that those with higher educations and more money know more.  That isn't the truth at all.  Also, that effect that the author describes supporters of Sanders and Clinton as well.  This article is simply a hit piece on Trump.  The paragraph starting with "all it took was a candidate to come along ..." Really?  Look at how ignorant the masses were when they voted for Obama.  All it took was for a candidate to come along to promise the masses everything and ... applies to his equally and history has proven that.  I'd suggest that this is simply another shill promoting in his covert way that he and his buddies are superior to the white trash out there.  Have grown up white trash, that author would get his ass kicked if he had the balls to say that stuff to any of my relatives. 
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #27 
I know some very smart people who are supporting Trump.  I chide bluedog to sharpen his edges, steel sharpens steel.  To get him mentally ready for the onslaught from the militant libtards coming his way.  It's going to be a war and we know libtards fear war.  Let the games begin
__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Posts: 22,659
Reply with quote  #28 
[CjtPafMWkAAyLZ-]
__________________
"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
keepinitreal

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Reply with quote  #29 

The endorsement of me by the 16,500 Border Patrol Agents was the first time that they ever endorsed a presidential candidate. Nice!


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"I like to establish the parameters of my own thoughts and don't think I need a director."

"This is not debate class. And this is not about politeness. We're talking about the damn future of our country"

"It is not just simply yelling out a name and yelling down dissenters........................... and I'll defend your right to even insult me" 
spazsdad

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Reply with quote  #30 
So this guy Dunning writes a hit piece on Trump citing his own research, named after himself, as proof of his opinion. Classic example of liberals self perceived superiority. Everyone is not only stupid but too stupid to know how stupid they are. Where have we read such condescending ramblings before, hmmm, I wonder.

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